quayside or embankment

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Ultramarine

Senior Member
Ukrainian
Hello everyone,
I'm not sure if I can use the words "quayside" and "embankment" interchangeably. Could someone have a look at the sentences?

In the evening we strolled down the Seine quayside.
In the evening we strolled down the Seine embankment.

There are a lot of cafes and souvenir stands on the quayside.
There are a lot of cafes and souvenir stands on the embankment.

Many thanks!
 
  • stormwreath

    Senior Member
    English - England
    They're not interchangeable, although the things they refer to are similar in nature. An embankment is a raised platform by the water's edge to stop the river flooding into the surrounding area; a quay is a raised platform by the water's edge where ships can tie up and unload. (And a 'quayside' is the side of the quay...) Usually a quay will be a specific structure in a docks area, while an embankment can run alongside the river for a long distance.
     

    grubble

    Senior Member
    British English
    Hello everyone,
    In the evening we strolled down the Seine embankment. :tick:

    There are a lot of cafes and souvenir stands on the quayside. :cross: Unlikely because they would interfere with loading and unloading the boats!

    There are a lot of cafes and souvenir stands on the embankment. :tick:

    Many thanks!
    Note: quayside is pronounce kee-side
     

    Ultramarine

    Senior Member
    Ukrainian
    Thank you! I've just opened my Straightforward coursebook (pre-int), page 32. there's a map of Newcastle there. In the bottom right-hand corner there is this word 'quayside' (next to Tyne bridge)and there's a sign 'bars and restaurants'. Should I still say 'Bars and restaurants are on the embankment" ?
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    In general, "quayside" only tells us there is a quay there. There may or may not be an embankment.

    In the case of Newcastle upon Tyne, it seems there is a specific area called "The Quayside". I don't know how the locals would feel if you called it "the embankment".
     

    mr cat

    Senior Member
    English - England
    In general, "quayside" only tells us there is a quay there. There may or may not be an embankment.

    In the case of Newcastle upon Tyne, it seems there is a specific area called "The Quayside". I don't know how the locals would feel if you called it "the embankment".
    They wouldn't know where you were talking about, you could say this is a former quayside, although ships do sometimes still moor there, it is now lined with bars, galleries etc.
     

    grubble

    Senior Member
    British English
    In general, "quayside" only tells us there is a quay there. There may or may not be an embankment.

    In the case of Newcastle upon Tyne, it seems there is a specific area called "The Quayside". I don't know how the locals would feel if you called it "the embankment".
    A. ..and the key (Haha!) part of it is
    The area was once an industrial .. and busy commercial dockside serving the area... In recent years ... the area has since been heavily redeveloped to provide a modern environment. So that explains the presence of cafes etc.

    B.
    If you visit London's famous sights you will surely see "The Embankment"
    The Thames Embankment is a major feat of 19th century civil engineering designed to reclaim marshy land next to the River Thames in central Londonhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thames_Embankment


     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    An embankment is an area of raised land often adjacent to a river or expanse of water. It often has a footpath/tow-path on it.
    A quay is an area where vessels load and discharge their cargoes. It is often at a height such that the vessel is more of less level with the quayside at the mid-tide mark.

    The names of both often appear as references to historical uses rather than actual descriptions. e.g. West India Quay, Canary Wharf, London and Quai d'Orsay, Paris.

    In your first examples, "the embankment" option is best. A quayside is usually not very long and a quayside may be on the embankment. However, in all cases, see if the area has a local name.
     
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