Que me escuches / Que me dejes en paz

Geona

New Member
English - US
¡Buenas noches a todos!

Duda para los hispanohablantes no españoles:

En España a menudo se reafirma un imperativo (cuando no han hecho caso) con que + subjuntivo:

Cállate, Miguel ... [Miguel sigue hablando] ... ¡Que te calles, he dicho!

Incluso con otro verbo:

No tengo ganas de tonterías ... ... ... ¡que me dejes en paz!

Me gustaría saber si el uso es igual, parecido o diferente en otros países. Lo pregunto porque alguna guía de gramática dice que este tipo de imperativo (que + subjuntivo) solamente se usa en tercera persona en imperativos indirectos (ej.: que traigan la comida), lo cual, en España al menos, es incorrecto.
 
  • purasbabosadas

    Senior Member
    English-USA
    My friends from Central America used the second person commands headed by "que" in repeated commands all the time.One example:

    1.(English speaker)"Turn it up!"(the music)

    2.(Honduran monolingual in Spanish)"¿Cómo?

    3.(Salvadoran bilingual in English and Spanish)"¡Que la suba!"(usted)
     

    Dosamuno

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    I taught English as a second language and encountered this form with people from all parts of South America.
    As Geona observes, it was common in Salamanca--and all over Spain, when I lived there in the 70s and 80s.

    A New Reference Grammar of Modern Spanish
    17.7 Second person imperatives preceded by que

    An imperative can be formed from a second person subjunctive preceded by que. This makes the order more emphatic or presents it as a reminder.

    Que tengas un buen fin de semana.
    Que no pierdas el dinero.
     

    duvija

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Uruguay
    I taught English as a second language and encountered this form with people from all parts of South America.
    As Geona observes, it was common in Salamanca--and all over Spain, when I lived there in the 70s and 80s.

    A New Reference Grammar of Modern Spanish
    17.7 Second person imperatives preceded by que

    An imperative can be formed from a second person subjunctive preceded by que. This makes the order more emphatic or presents it as a reminder.

    Que tengas un buen fin de semana.
    Que no pierdas el dinero.
    :thumbsup::thumbsup:
     

    Geona

    New Member
    English - US
    Thanks for the replies, folks!

    It does seem that in some countries, this form is so uncommon as to sound wrong to people, but it also sounds like it's not exclusive to Spain.

    With respect to your two examples, Dosamuno, the guide where I saw the 2nd-person imperative get the thumbs-down did allow for it as a wish or desire, as if a verb like "quiero" or "deseo" were omitted (your first example). What they objected to was its use as an explicit order: "Do this."
     

    S.V.

    Senior Member
    Español, México
    It does seem that in some countries, this form is so uncommon as to sound wrong to people, but it also sounds like it's not exclusive to Spain.
    I guess it's a voseo thing. They use vos instead of / alongside in some areas of LatAm, but its conjugation is incomplete, so ¡que os calléis! did not really give ¡que te callés! And the entire structure is instead avoided, it seems.

    ¡Que te calles!, ¡que me dejes en paz! are natural over here, in Mexico.
     
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    Doraemon-

    Senior Member
    "Spanish - Spain" "Catalan - Valencia"
    No se usa con la misma frecuencia en todos los países hispanohablantes, pero es perfectamente correcto: ¡[Te digo] que te calles!
     

    Geona

    New Member
    English - US
    Who objected to this? :confused:
    As Dosamuno said, it was in some LAm grammar guides, and some coworkers of mine agreed. Since I learned my Spanish in Spain, I was befuddled, lol.

    But we all know how these things go. Someone might not have personally heard of something before, so they say, "Well in my country we don't..." and so on. Case in point, I'm from the US, but the first time I heard another American say "might could" :eek: I was 40 years old. Before then, I would've sworn up and down that no American would ever say that. :D
     
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