quedarse, y pico

LyLyLy

Member
South Korea; Spanish, Korean and Gallician.
Hey everybody!!

How would you guys say in English: Me quedan 4 meses y pico en este pais.


Thanks in advance! :)
 
  • unspecified

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    I have just over 4 months left in this country.

    Normally, you're supposed to try to translate it yourself (or at least as much as you are able). That way, we can help you more.

    Anyway, keep this in mind for the next time you post. I hope this helps!
     

    JB

    Senior Member
    English (AE)
    A "pico" is a bird's beak (one meaning).
    Unspecified's translation is perfect.
    I just add that the expression "y pico" means "a little bit more", but can be translated in various ways.
     

    peterfenn

    Banned
    Waray-Waray
    Perhaps "I have four and a bit months left in this country". (Though gramatically incorrect it can be and is often expressed in this way.)
     

    JB

    Senior Member
    English (AE)
    LyLyLy,
    It occurs to me that you never told us what your specific question was, what part of the translation was giving you trouble. At first I assumed it had to do with "y pico", but now I realize it might have been the "me quedan" part that caused you trouble.

    While there is no absolute rule that you must provide your own translation, if you will attempt to do so in the future (making use of the WR Dictionary, if necessary, which has entries for both "qeudan" and "pico") it will help the rest of us see where the confusion lies and, as unspecified already said, help you better.
    Thanks
    The Moderators
     

    anochecer

    Senior Member
    USA -- English
    I have a little over four months left in this country.
    I have slightly more than four months left here.
    (less formal) -- I've got a little bit more than four months left here (in this country).
    I agree with Unspecified, too.

    Peterfenn-- maybe this is a difference in English from one country to the next, but "I have four and a bit months left in this country" would sound very awkward, incorrect even, to this native speaker of (United States) English. Maybe that's a British expression?
     

    peterfenn

    Banned
    Waray-Waray
    Yes it's definitely incorrect (as previously stated), though still expressed in this way often. And yes it must be a transatlantic difference thing, etc. To me, "I've got a little bit more than four months left here (in this country)" sounds incredibly clumsy and non-native English. What can I say?!
     
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