question about Must and Oblige?

keung

Senior Member
Chinese
1. Must i provide the letter to you?
2. Mustn't i provide the letter to you?
3. M'i obliged to provide the letter?
4. I must oblige to provide the letter?
5. Must i oblige to provide the letter?
6. I must oblige to provide the letter, mustn't it?
7. Is't obligatory that i must provide the letter?

Which sentence are correct and which pattern most likely use in conversation (oral)?

Isn't that Must and Oblige almost meaning the same in above sentence, so I sould not applied into one sentence?

thank!
 
  • difficult cuss

    Senior Member
    English England
    1. Must i provide the letter to you? good
    2. Mustn't i provide the letter to you? good
    3. M'i obliged to provide the letter? Am I.... good
    4. I must oblige to provide the letter? bad
    5. Must i oblige to provide the letter? bad
    6. I must oblige to provide the letter, mustn't it? very bad
    7. Is't obligatory that i must provide the letter? Is it.... poor (you should choose either "obligatory" or "must" not both, in this sentence, the word order means that you should drop "must").
     

    liliput

    Senior Member
    U.K. English
    "Do I have to provide you with the letter?" is more likely than any of these in conversation.
    "Is it compulsory to..?" is another alternative.
     

    tanager

    Senior Member
    US/English
    The basic difference:
    I must
    I am obliged

    Both sound formal to me; "Do I have to...?" and "Do I need to...?" (from liliput and libre pensador) are more conversational.
     

    KHS

    Senior Member
    Yes, should can be used.

    Let me suggest that the verb 'provide' is a bit formal, so would fit a more formal situation.

    In an informal situation, I'd be more likely to say, "Do I need to/have to give you the letter?
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Can I insert 'Should' instead of 'Must' in this sentence?
    Will be changed meaning of it?
    (How its meaning will be changed??)
    I agree that "should" can be used to ask whether you are required to provide a letter. In fact, it is what I would be more likely to say. There is a slight difference in tone:
    "Should I provide a letter?" is framed as a request for advice even though a person is really asking whether it is required.

    "Must I provide a letter?" is framed as a question about rules or requirements. It is a question as to whether there will be unfortunate consequences if you don't send a letter.
    As I said, in fact, both are used to ask about requirements. I agree with KHS about less formal and more colloquial way this might be said.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top