Question for 'travel/tour/trip/journey'

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sun.lua

New Member
Taiwan, Chinese
Hi, guys

I’m rookie of the Forms. Nice to meet you!
I have a question for the ‘travel/tour/trip/journey’ those word in the Chinese were same mean.

I had confused those words which I don’t knew how put in use.:confused:
For example:
If I go other place only 1~3 days should I use the trip or travel?

Have some one could teach me how should I use it?
Many thanks for your kindly.
 
  • born in newyork

    Senior Member
    U.S.A./English
    Some of the words you mention are used as nouns ("a tour," "a trip," "a journey," and, less commonly, "travels," used as a plural). Some are used as verbs ("to travel," "to tour," "to journey") ("to trip" means to fall). Most are used as both, as you can see.

    In your sentence, I would say:

    "I am going on a trip for a few days."

    In this context, "journey" is less used and implies a much longer period of time and perhaps somewhere distant. "Tour" as a noun means it is being organized by someone else, who will be leading you around, which I assume is not what you mean.

    I hope this helps.
     

    Kane

    Senior Member
    French - Canada
    Here are some examples:
    Trip: a journey in which you go somewhere, usually for a short time, and come back again: The trip from Montreal to Quebec takes about an hour by car.

    Tour: a visit to a place or area, especially one during which you look round the place or area and learn about it: We went on a guided tour of the museum
    Tour: a journey made for pleasure, especially as a holiday, visiting several different places in an area: a cycling tour of Montreal

    Travel: To make a journey, usually over a long distance: This man has travelled all over the world.

    Journey: The act of travelling from one place to another, especially in a vehicle: I love going on long journeys.
     

    sun.lua

    New Member
    Taiwan, Chinese
    Thank you so much!

    Now, I understand all about those word means.
    Next time how should I choose the word when I talk some one or write article.
     

    dudass

    Senior Member
    spanish
    Is it possible to say "the trip takes about one hour and a half"? Or whenever I mean the time from one place to the other I must say "journey"?

    Thank you.
     

    Cenzontle

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    "Journey" is rare in AE. "The trip takes about an hour and a half" is the usual way I hear it said.
     

    Glenfarclas

    Senior Member
    English (American)
    I agree we require context, but not that 'journey' is rarely used in English: maybe in American English.
    Maybe you use it a lot more in British English? I don't know. I do know that it's one of those words that learners are told is the translation for a common word in their own language, and then they use it much more than we really do in the face of other common alternatives we have. The classic example is "arrive" (e.g., "When I arrived to home last night...").
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    I think we do use it more. Cenzontle for example says: "The trip takes about an hour and a half". I have no problem with that at all and would probably say it too, but I also happily say that my journey to work takes an hour and would not bad an eyelid if someone were to enquire how long my journey to work takes.:)

    Something else just popped into my head: school journeys. I went on several ofthese when I was at (secondary) school: a week in Scotland, two weeks in France and Italy, etc. These were different from the trips we went on, for example a trip to Calais, which was a one-day trip, or a day out to visit a meseum (a trip to the mususem). How would you describe those in AE?
     
    Last edited:

    Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    Hi, I have a new question:

    One of my friends went to a place of interest in Sichuan province, it's not in my city, but not very far from my city. The other day she came back, I said:

    Tell me something about your trip.

    Or do I need to say:

    Tell me somethign about your journey.

    Thanks a lot
     

    Cenzontle

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    I cannot speak for UK English. In American English, traveling from one geographical place to another is a "trip".
    When Americans say "your journey", usually they mean something like "your spiritual journey through life".
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    One of my friends went to a place of interest in Sichuan province, it's not in my city, but not very far from my city. The other day she came back, I said:

    Tell me something about your trip.
    I wouldn't use 'something' in that sentence. I would say, Tell me about your trip! or How was your trip? Did you have a good time? :)
     

    March31

    Member
    Chinese
    I travelled to Europe.:cross:
    I made a trip to Europe.:tick:

    My friend told me the first sentence is incorrect, and he corrected that for me. could you tell me why the first sentence is incorrect? Is it because "travel" shouldn't go with destination?

    Thanks!
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    I travelled to Europe.:cross:
    I made a trip to Europe.:tick:

    My friend told me the first sentence is incorrect, and he corrected that for me. could you tell me why the first sentence is incorrect? Is it because "travel" shouldn't go with destination?
    In the absence of any context, the only reason I can think of for marking the first sentence as incorrect is that as it stands, it implies that you didn't come back again. The second sentence suggests to me that the 'trip' was a return trip :).
     

    March31

    Member
    Chinese
    Thank you both very much. He told me that the first sentence is Chinglish, but maybe he is wrong too because he is non native speaker either but his English is better than I.
     

    zaffy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Trip: a journey in which you go somewhere, usually for a short time, and come back again
    Journey: The act of travelling from one place to another
    "The trip took him two days."
    "The journey took him two days."

    So, in the first example, the whole trip took him two days, in other words he was back home after two days. Whereas in the second example, he reached the destination within two days. Then perhaps he was at the destination for a few days and all in all he came back home after say a week, right?
     

    zaffy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    I think we do use it more. Cenzontle for example says: "The trip takes about an hour and a half". I have no problem with that at all and would probably say it too, but I also happily say that my journey to work takes an hour and would not bad an eyelid if someone were to enquire how long my journey to work takes.:)
    So a trip has two meanings. One is connected with leisure time, e.g., "I took a fantastic trip to New York" and the other refers the act of travelling somewhere, e.g., "The trip to the shop took half an hour", Am I right?
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    So a trip has two meanings. One is connected with leisure time, e.g., "I took a fantastic trip to New York" and the other refers the act of travelling somewhere, e.g., "The trip to the shop took half an hour", Am I right?
    There's not necessarily a connection with leisure time. Many people make business trips, for example.

    The WR dictionary definitions are helpful here:

    • a traveling from one place to another: my weekly trip to the bank.
    • a run made by a boat, train, or the like between two points: The trip takes just two hours by ferry.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    As I've said in other threads, in AE I think we (or at least a lot of us) tend to see a journey as something arduous and out of the ordinary. Going to work would not be a journey unless you rode a bike, swam across a river, hitchhiked on a railroad car and crawled the last ten feet under barbed wire. Okay, that's an exaggeration, but an ordinary trip is not a journey. An example of a journey would be a trip through the Andes mountains, seeing places you've never seen before.

    When I went to Mexico for a week in junior high school that was a school trip. A one day excursion somewhere from school was called a field trip.
     

    zaffy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    • a traveling from one place to another: my weekly trip to the bank.
    • a run made by a boat, train, or the like between two points: The trip takes just two hours by ferry.
    Are these two equally natural and mean the same?

    "On the way to the bank this morning, I met John"
    "During the trip to the bank this morning, I met John"
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    "The trip took him two days."
    "The journey took him two days."

    So, in the first example, the whole trip took him two days, in other words he was back home after two days. Whereas in the second example, he reached the destination within two days. Then perhaps he was at the destination for a few days and all in all he came back home after say a week, right?
    In the absence of any specific context (to indicate where he went and what he did when he got there) I'd regard that as a reasonable assumption to make, yes.
    Are these two equally natural and mean the same?

    "On the way to the bank this morning, I met John"
    "During the trip to the bank this morning, I met John"
    The second one could include the possibility that he met John on the way back from the bank this morning, whereas the first one clearly doesn't. :)
     

    zaffy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    In the absence of any specific context (to indicate where he went and what he did when he got there) I'd regard that as a reasonable assumption to make, yes.
    The second one could include the possibility that he met John on the way back from the bank this morning, whereas the first one clearly doesn't. :)
    So to make things clear that it was on the way to the bank, I believe I could say in BE "During the journey to the bank this morning, I met John" , right?
     

    sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    So to make things clear that it was on the way to the bank, I believe I could say in BE "During the journey to the bank this morning, I met John" , right?
    That would depend on the circumstances (context). The bank I use is six or seven minutes' walk from where I live. I walk to it. I don't use "trip" or "journey" to refer to my visits. I would say, "While I was walking to the bank this morning, I met John."
     

    zaffy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    AE speakers don't use 'journey' unless they are talking about something arduous and out of the ordinary, so what are the AE equivalents of these common expressions?

    -Did you have a good journey?
    -Bye! Safe journey!
    -Have a safe journey home!
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    what are the AE equivalents of these common expressions?
    1. Did you have a good journey?
    2. Bye! Safe journey!
    3. Have a safe journey home!
    1. It's hard to say without more details
    2. That sounds normal if you are going somewhere unusual. It doesn't sound normal if you're going to work for the 2000th time.
    3. Have a safe trip home sounds normal.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I generally wouldn't use trip or journey when talking about going to the bank. If something unusual did happen that was worth taking about (unlikely) I would just say "on my way to the bank" or "on my way back from the bank".

    And I wouldn't say "met", but that's a completely different question.
    Run Into/Come Across/Encounter

    On my way to the bank this morning I ran into John, my old boss.
     
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