Question of case in a particular rendering of the English preposition "of".

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Michael Zwingli

Senior Member
English - American (U.S. - New England)
Hello all.
I am (constantly) having trouble with rendering the proper case in Latin constructions translating English prose. In this instance, my quandary has to do with the proper case to use for the rendering into Latin of the English "...of a good man" in the sentence "Kindness is the mark of a good man." The preposition "of" in this case is, I think, being used partitively, so I think that I would want to use the ablative in Latin, as: "Cāritās sīgnum virō bonō est." Of course, I wanted to check my thinking with those online here. Our idiomatic use of prepositions in English often gives me trouble in rendering such sentences into Latin. Thanks for your attention.
 
  • Michael Zwingli

    Senior Member
    English - American (U.S. - New England)
    Now, that throws me a bit... I know that the genitive is usually given as "of" in English, and the ablative also can be given as "of", but my initial thoughts were that because of the partitive sense here, I would want to use the ablative. Jazyk, can you explain your recommendation a bit more to me, if you have time?
     

    Michael Zwingli

    Senior Member
    English - American (U.S. - New England)
    Ah, thanks for that, man. I tend to think of the genitive case only in terms of describing origin, but the "Thought Co." article that you hyperlinked tells a different story. I guess that the genitive case is used much more broadly than I thought.
     
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