"questioning its legitimacy would be subaltern and thus obsolete."

Garfieldgo

Member
Chinese - Taiwan
Hello everyone:
The title is quoted from a CD booklet, here is the link:https://goo.gl/ugTi1v
Whole paragraph on page 16 from "Those who listen to the Lucerne interpretation......." to "
questioning its legitimacy, however, would be subaltern and thus obsolete."
I don't understand the conclusion is negative or positive because "subaltern and thus obsolete" sounds not good.
But the paragraph seems to praise the conductor's interpretation.
I'm really confused about it.
I would be very grateful for any feedback.
 
  • RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    The only meaning I knew for subaltern was a British Army term meaning lieutenant, but according to the WRF dictionary it is also an adjective relating to inferiority or lower status.

    The paragraph is praising the conductor; that is why it says that questioning the legitimacy of his interpretation would be subaltern and obsolete (though I'm not sure how obsolete fits in here).
     

    Nunty

    Modified
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    From your source, the English appears to be translated from the German text. Perhaps the German word has meanings or connotations that the English one lacks. You might want to ask over in the Deutsch (German) forum.
     

    Garfieldgo

    Member
    Chinese - Taiwan
    Thanks for advice.
    My reading is "Though you might doubt Furtwangler's interpretation, but now we all know he was such a great conductor ever. Questioning its legitimacy would be unnecessary and old-thinking (his contemporaries might think his interpretation is inappropriate)."

    Is it over-translated?
     

    Nunty

    Modified
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    I wish I could give you a reliable answer, Garfieldgo, but I cannot. I do not understand what is meant by "subaltern" in your text. Sorry. :(
     
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