Questions there were no answers to, questions it's impossible to know the answers of/for

rightnow

Senior Member
Spanish
Questions there were no answers to, questions it's impossible to know the answers of/for
Is it grammatically correct to omit a relative pronoun for a defining relative with a dummy subject and final preposition?
 
  • JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Where did you see this sentence? What came before it? (You know, like some context, setting up possible structures/meanings etc). It's a sentence fragment and it seems most likely to be used after a colon, such as "They faced many questions: ......" In such a context, it is unremarkable.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Yes, it’s normal. That’s the idiomatic alternative to the more formal to which construction (I wouldn’t use of or for in this case).

    Questions to which there were no answers, [questions] to which it's impossible to know the answers.
    Questions there were no answers to, questions it's impossible to know the answers to.
     
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