Questions with prepositions at the end

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moseen

Senior Member
Farsi
Hello everybody!
If "of", "with", "in", at the end of the questions omitted what do the meaning of questions change, please?
- Jack was afraid.
What was be afraid of?

-Tom's father is in hospital.
Which hospital is he in?

- Kate is going on holiday.
Who is she going with?
 
  • MaeDay

    Member
    English - United States
    That question would be fine, and would produce more or less the same answer.

    I suspect you may be trying to avoid ending sentences and questions with prepositions, as the old prescriptivist language rule goes. If so, there’s no need to follow that rule in modern English.
     

    moseen

    Senior Member
    Farsi
    That question would be fine, and would produce more or less the same answer.

    I suspect you may be trying to avoid ending sentences and questions with prepositions, as the old prescriptivist language rule goes. If so, there’s no need to follow that rule in modern English.
    Thank you very much.
    How can I avoid ending this questions with the prepositions at the end, please?
     

    MaeDay

    Member
    English - United States
    Thank you very much.
    How can I avoid ending this questions with the prepositions at the end, please?
    Please notice I said that there is no need to follow this rule.

    For example, if you did follow the rule, one of your questions would be “In which hospital is he?” This may be grammatically correct, technically, but it sounds very unnatural (at least in American English).
     

    moseen

    Senior Member
    Farsi
    Can this statement be questioned:D with "who with?" or with "with who?", please?
    Kate is going on holiday
     

    MarcB

    Senior Member
    US English
    That old rule is dead and.buried, so forget it. The .most common is with who. Who with and with whom are possible but less likely.
     

    moseen

    Senior Member
    Farsi
    The most natural way to ask this question is 'Who is Kate going on holiday with?'
    Thank you so much.
    Agreed, unless someone had just said "Kate is going on holiday" when "Who with?" is adequate.
    Thank you so much.

    Sorry, is it correct to answer the question below as "Who did you go to with?". Is "the cinema" after "go to" necessary?
    "I went to the cinema with xxxx".
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Please notice I said that there is no need to follow this rule.

    For example, if you did follow the rule, one of your questions would be “In which hospital is he?” This may be grammatically correct, technically, but it sounds very unnatural (at least in American English).

    I agree. My teachers taught the same rule, but over the years I've seen that obeying the rule often leads to silly sounding and convoluted sentences. I chucked that rule out years ago.
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    If the speaker knows you went to the cinema with somebody, they might ask 'Who did you go with?'. They wouldn't need to say 'to the cinema'.

    If you said to somebody "I went to the cinema with xxxx", they wouldn't need to ask 'who with?' as you've already told them who you went with.

    Cross-posted. This is in reply to #17.
     

    moseen

    Senior Member
    Farsi
    I agree. My teachers taught the same rule, but over the years I've seen that obeying the rule often leads to silly sounding and convoluted sentences. I chucked that rule out years ago.
    Thank you very much.
    If the speaker knows you went to the cinema with somebody, they might ask 'Who did you go with?'. They wouldn't need to say 'to the cinema'.

    If you said to somebody "I went to the cinema with xxxx", they wouldn't need to ask 'who with?' as you've already told them who you went with.

    Cross-posted. This is in reply to #17.
    Thank you very much for your help.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Thank you very much.

    Thank you very much for your help.
    You should note that your teachers will still insist that there be no preposition at the end of a sentence. Until you graduate from school you should humor them. Later in life you can laugh.:)
     
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