Questo sconosciuto

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*Snow*

Senior Member
Italian
Hi there :)
I'd like to know how I can translate the phrase "questo sconosciuto" into English. If I'm not wrong we use it ironically when we want to explain something new to somebody. I'll give you an example of something which is considered difficult both in English and Italian: "I condizionali, questi sconosciuti". My attempt would be "Conditionals, the unknown". Does it make any sense?

Thanks :)
 
  • rrose17

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    I'm thinking "the great unknown" which is a common expression, but I'm not getting "Ironia" how is that related to "sconosciuta"?
     

    *Snow*

    Senior Member
    Italian
    I'm thinking "the great unknown" which is a common expression, but I'm not getting "Ironia" how is that related to "sconosciuta"?
    That's quite a common set phrase used when you want to say that somebody doesn't get irony :) ( and that's sarchasm :p ).
     

    rrose17

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    Not everyone appreciates sarcasm, to be sure, like my wife, for example. :cool: Not sure about set idioms that might say what you're looking for, usually they're more about the speaker than the obtuseness of the listener. But then there's Oscar Wilde who was very famous for his ironic wit. One of his quotations is "Irony is wasted on the stupid." But this wouldn't work with your original "I condizionali".
     

    tsoapm

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    I don’t think there’s a snappy equivalent in English. Maybe you could do something with ‘mystery’.

    The great mystery of conditionals.

    Or for the irony thing:

    That was that ‘irony’ thing you may have heard about.
     

    rrose17

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    The great mystery of conditionals.
    That was that ‘irony’ thing you may have heard about.
    :thumbsup: Both are great! Made me think of "The final frontier", from Star Trek fame. "Conditionals: the final frontier" Could almost work for irony too.
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    I think I would use 'elusive' in this situation. 'Enigmatic' (similar to Mark's 'mystery') might even work.

    Ah, the elusive conditional!
    Ah, the elusive irony!
    Ah, the elusive grammar!
     
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