qui l'entoure tel un volume contemporain

sport99

Senior Member
English - Canada
Bonjour,

In a text describing a house and the street on which it is located, there is mention of a "volume." I have no idea what this is referring to? Is it simply a reference to the presence of the house on the street?

"La maison s'insère parfaitement dans son cadre urbain en tirant le plus grand parti possible du coin de verdure qui l'entoure tel un volume contemporain bien ancré sur la rue, tout en étant ouvert sur le parc environant."

Mon essaie :

"[...] a contemporary presence rooted on the street[...]."

Thank you

Moderator note: Translation attempt trimmed to maintain focus on the specific phrase in question.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • iuytr

    Senior Member
    french
    I don't know how to translate it, but volume here belongs to the architecture vocabulary. For me , this is quite literal, a 3d object with its length, width, height ... maybe a shape if you can use it in english for a building ?
     

    sport99

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    Thank you. The reference is to a house on a street, nothing more complex. I think i will go with "contemporary (living) space."
     

    sport99

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    Merci beaucoup pour votre aide!

    Doesn't the presence of a 3D structure imply that there is a "space" within? Making reference to an "architectural volume" on a street doesn't seem idiomatic in English.
     

    AmaryllisBunny

    Senior Member
    What iuytr is saying is that space is more of a 2D descriptive whereas volume refers to specifically to 3D. However, it nonetheless begs the question, "is this idiomatic?" to which I think not.

    Making reference to an "architectural volume" on a street doesn't seem idiomatic in English.
    Edit:

    PS — I will go look at my architecture book and give a more thorough response in 10 hours.
     
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    iuytr

    Senior Member
    french
    AmaryllisBunny is right, it is absolutely not idiomatic but a part of architecture jargon. You will find it only in architecture magazine or architect's brochure or architecture student conversation ;)

    There are others hints in the original sentence belonging to this style : "ancré", "ouvert sur le parc", "s'insère dans son cadre".
     

    sport99

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    Thank you all very much for your consideration.

    Finally, does "contemporary architectural volume" convey the meaning of "un volume contemporain"?
     
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