qui peut être ceuilli/récolté/ramassé/coupé

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Piaume

New Member
Français
Bonjour,

Existe-t-il un mot anglais, plutôt générique, traduisant qui peut être cueilli/récolté/ramassé/coupé ?

(une ressource quelconque: bois, fleur, etc)

Merci ;)
 
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  • Geordie_Wilber

    Senior Member
    Geordieland, Geordie (English of sorts!)
    S'il fallait qu'un seul mot, je dirais "harvested", mais cela ne conviendrait pas partout. Tout comme en français on à souvent besoin d'être plus précis... Collected, gathered, cut, picked...
     

    Guynouche

    Senior Member
    English
    The term "harvested" implies the use of a machine
    Collected, gathered, cut, picked... can either be by hand or by machine.
     

    Geordie_Wilber

    Senior Member
    Geordieland, Geordie (English of sorts!)
    The term "harvested" implies the use of a machine
    Collected, gathered, cut, picked... can either be by hand or by machine.
    I beg to differ. Much as we are used to our harvests being mechanically aided for a couple of hundreds of years, there is no such implication. For example, apples and many other fruits are harvested by hand. A quick google turned up this from the US Environmental Protection website:

    Field crops are harvested by machine, while small fruits and other food crops are typically harvested by hand, although in certain cases, they may be harvested by machine.

    The next site in the list of 1,640,000 hits for "crops harvested by hand" talks of the loss of yield in machine harvested raspberries as opposed to those harvested by hand.

    You may consider that all harvests are mechanical but not everyone shares that opinion.
     

    Guynouche

    Senior Member
    English
    Thanks for your English lesson.I would still only use the term "harvest" to indicate some sort of large scale activity. I would not say "My wife went out to the garden to harvest some flowers for the Dining Room table!"
     

    Geordie_Wilber

    Senior Member
    Geordieland, Geordie (English of sorts!)
    Thanks for your English lesson.
    I'm sorry if you felt I was giving you a lesson. What I wanted to do was simply to show that when you said "The term "harvested" implies the use of a machine", what you had given was your opinion, rather than a statement of fact. Which is, I feel, important for the other readers/users of this dictionary.

    I would still only use the term "harvest" to indicate some sort of large scale activity. I would not say "My wife went out to the garden to harvest some flowers for the Dining Room table!"
    I have no problem with that at all. I certainly agree with you that neither your wife nor I would "harvest" flowers from the garden :)

    Still, let's cut this short, I picked a word and now I'm reaping what I have sown. I shall gather my strength and head boldly into the weekend, with the fervent hope that we both have an equally good one!

    Cheers,
    Wilber.
     
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    steppingstone

    Member
    English UK
    Are you concerned to convey the fact that the crop can physically be cut down, dug out of the ground etc.? If so, I'm struggling to think of a reasonable generic term. "harvestable" would probably be understood, but it's ugly! Much would depend on context as it could be taken to mean "ready for harvest" e.g. The wheat should be harvestable in a week's time.
    If however the emphasis is on the crop as "une ressource quelconque", perhaps it's enough to speak of an "economic crop".
     

    The Prof

    Senior Member
    I can't think of one expression that could be used in all instances, either. If we were talking purely about commercial production, then I believe that 'harvested' could be used for most crops, including flowers, fruit, vegetables and even wood.

    However, on a non-commercial scale, I would agree completely with Geordie: I can't imagine anyone ever saying they were going out to the garden to harvest some flowers - or wood!

    If I had to limit the vocabulary I use in relation to my own produce to three words, they would be 'cut' and 'pick' for crops above ground, and 'lift' for those that are below. But I don't expect everyone to agree! :)
     
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