quinze à/A, trente à/A (tennis)

pepper1

Senior Member
English - Ireland
Am enjoying Roland Garros at the moment... with regard to scoring, I often hear "quinze à", "trente à", etc for "fifteen all", "thirty all", etc.

What is the derivation? Does that mean "quinze à [chacun des deux joueurs]"?

Merci d'avance.
 
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  • timboleicester

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    Am enjoying Roland Garros at the moment... with regard to scoring, I often hear "quinze à", "trente à", etc for "fifteen all", "thirty all", etc.

    What is the derivation? Does that mean "quinze à [chacun des deux joueurs]"?

    Merci d'avance.
    I am told it isn't "à" it's just a. The first letter of "ALL" which is the only bit the french scoring kept as they didn't get what "all" meant.....I was told this by a french person so no offence intended.
     

    charameau

    New Member
    English
    In a game of tennis, it sounds as if "30 all" is "trente à".

    Is this right?...and if so, what is it short for??

    MTIA
     

    snarkhunter

    Senior Member
    French - France
    Depending on the umpire, it may be told as "trente à" or "trente partout"...
    I do not haver the official explanation for "à", so I guess it's only a shorter way to mean "trente à trente" (and it almost sounds like "all", as well), which then makes the second score almost superfluous.
     

    Eric75

    Senior Member
    Français - France
    I agree with SnarkHunter, it's an abbreviation of "trente à trente". In tennis, the scores used to be "quarante à trente", "trente à quinze", etc.
    This remains only in "quinze/trente/quarante à rien".
     

    alisonp

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    Interesting - I'd always thought it was "trente all", with the "l" not really being pronounced.

    Do the French really use "rien" these days? I thought it was "zéro" or something, which is really ironic when you think that the English term "love" derives from the French term "l'oeuf"!
     

    GerardM

    Senior Member
    French
    Hi alisonp,
    Interesting - I'd always thought it was "trente all", with the "l" not really being pronounced.
    Definitely, it's "trente à".

    Do the French really use "rien" these days? I thought it was "zéro" or something,
    Both expressions "Trente-zéro" or "Trente à rien". I rather hear "Trente-zéro".
    The reverse score is "Zéro-Trente" rather than "Rien à Trente".

    which is really ironic when you think that the English term "love" derives from the French term "l'oeuf"!
    Oh, I didn't know about this origin! Interesting!
     
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