Quis separabit?

Katerina R.

New Member
Russian
Hello everyone,

I know the motto Quis separabit? (Who shall separate us?) derives from the Bible quote ("Who shall separate us from the love of Christ?"). Is it correct to use this phrase in the sense of "Who shall separate us from each other" rather than "Who shall separate us from something/someone"?
 
  • Starless74

    Senior Member
    Italiano
    Hello,
    I believe dĭrĭmo,-is,-emi,-emptum,-ĕre is more accurate, to indicate a third party is acting to separate two people from each other.
    If this is so, the equivalent of the well-known motto might be: Quis dĭrĭmet? o_O
     
    Last edited:

    Katerina R.

    New Member
    Russian
    Hello,
    I believe dĭrĭmo,-is,-emi,-emptum,-ĕre is more accurate, to indicate a third party is acting to separate two people from each other.
    If this is so, the equivalent of the well-known motto might be: Quis dĭrĭmet? o_O
    Thank you! Is Quis separabit? incorrect, though, or just less appropriate?
     

    Starless74

    Senior Member
    Italiano
    Sēpăro stems from sē părāre = to afford / to arrange for oneself (sē).
    Don't take my word for it, but looking up sēpărare in my dictionary today I mostly found examples indicating "separating one thing/person from a whole"
    rather than "separating two people/things from each other".
    I may be wrong, though, so wait for more answers. :)
     

    exgerman

    Senior Member
    NYC
    English but my first language was German
    St. Paul's sentence is quis nos separabit a caritate Christi? Who will separate us from the love of Christ? In the language of the Vulgate Bible (but not in Classical Latin), each other is an indeclinable word invicem. (As in novum mandatum do vobis, ut diligatis invicem I give you a new commandment, that you love one another).

    So in biblical Latin, your sentence would be Quis nos separabit invicem? You could just use quis separabit? as a shortcut, leaving it up to the hearer to figure out who may or may not be separated from whom, just as the various Northern Irish units have done.

    The se- in separare is a prefix meaning "apart". It is not the 3rd person reflexive pronoun, and se parare does not mean the same as separare. Se- occurs in the following English words derived from Latin, among others:

    1. secret: piece of information kept “apart” from what you’re comfortable revealin
    2. select: single “apart” from a number of things
    3. separate: keep “apart” from other things
    4. sever: cut “apart”
    5. secede: go “apart”
    6. segregate: to keep certain groups of people “apart” from one another
    7. sedition: a going “apart” from an existing government
    8. seclude: shut “apart
    9. sedulous: of being “apart” from slacking of
    10. secure: “apart” from care or worry
     
    Last edited:

    Katerina R.

    New Member
    Russian
    St. Paul's sentence is quis nos separabit a caritate Christi? Who will separate us from the love of Christ? In the language of the Vulgate Bible (but not in Classical Latin), each other is an indeclinable word invicem. (As in novum mandatum do vobis, ut diligatis invicem I give you a new commandment, that you love one another).

    So in biblical Latin, your sentence would be Quis nos separabit invicem? You could just use quis separabit? as a shortcut, leaving it up to the hearer to figure out who may or may not be separated from whom, just as the various Northern Irish units have done.

    The se- in separare is a prefix meaning "apart". It is not the 3rd person reflexive pronoun, and se parare does not mean the same as separare. Se- occurs in the following English words derived from Latin, among others:

    1. secret: piece of information kept “apart” from what you’re comfortable revealin
    2. select: single “apart” from a number of things
    3. separate: keep “apart” from other things
    4. sever: cut “apart”
    5. secede: go “apart”
    6. segregate: to keep certain groups of people “apart” from one another
    7. sedition: a going “apart” from an existing government
    8. seclude: shut “apart
    9. sedulous: of being “apart” from slacking of
    10. secure: “apart” from care or worry
    Thank you!
     
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