quit or quit from

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Senior Member
Chinese
Hello,

I know "quit" can be a transitive or an intransitive verb. So I was wondering whether I should say "quit a company" or "quit from a company"?

For example:
Tom quit [from] General Moters, the company he worked for.
 
  • sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Don't.

    Look at the dictionary here.

    Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::

    quit /kwɪt/vb (quits, quitting) (quitted, chiefly us quit)
    • (transitive) to depart from; leave

    Would you say "depart from from General Motors?"

    I don't think so.

    As an added note, "the company he worked for" is just wordy and wasted.

    If he didn't work there in the first place, he couldn't have quit.
     

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    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Oh, I see. Thanks a lot for your explanation, Sdgraham! It's very clear and understandable!
     
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