Quite <rightly> <right>, the environment is of great concern.

loviii

Senior Member
russian
Greetings!

oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com:
(1) Quite rightly, the environment is of great concern.

"Rightly" is an adverb of manner. It can't be used with a linking verb. We can't say "to be rightly", we must say only "to be right". Why am I wrong?

My version:
(2) Quite right, the environment is of great concern.
What's the difference between (1) and (2)?

Thanks!
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    The difference is that (1) is correct and (2) isn’t.

    Quite rightly, the environment is of great concern. :tick:
    The environment is of great concern, and rightly so! :tick:

    You can say “Quite right!” to someone in order to agree with what they’ve just said, but that’s using right as an adjective. It can also be used as an adverb, but not as you suggest. Examples are:

    He walked right up to me.
    She won’t be long – she’s coming right back.
    It’s essential that you do it right.
    Turn right at the next junction.
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    (1) Quite rightly, the environment is of great concern.

    "Rightly" is an adverb of manner. It can't be used with a linking verb. We can't say "to be rightly", we must say only "to be right". Why am I wrong?
    It probably makes sense to assume an omission in that first phrase, loviii: (People say) quite correctly/rightly (that) the environment is of great concern. To tell you the truth, I'm not very enthusiastic about this sentence or similar ones.

    (2) Quite right, the environment is of great concern.
    What's the difference between (1) and (2)?
    I also think that your sentence would benefit greatly from the inclusion of a few more words: It is quite right that the environment is of great concern.

    I doubt that adding quite rightly or quite right to either sentence does anything useful. I'd rather see The environment is of great concern. I can make up my own mind about the rightness of that concern without any help from a writer who wishes to stuff his own opinion into the sentence.
     
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