quiver/tingle/tremble

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GandalfMB

Senior Member
Bulgarian - Yellow Beach
Hello,
These are original sentences "The memory of the day made him quiver with anger.", "The dog quivered with excitement". I also came across "Her voice trembled with excitement." on OALD. That's fine but don't we usually tingle with excitement and tremble with fear? I think that "tremble" has a negative connotation. We can tingle with excitement, or the cold/heat can make someone's cheeks tingle. Other things tingle as well, but I am not going to bring that up. Can we use both with quiver? Anger and excitement. Is it neutral? Can we also shake with anger? I think it is possible.


Thank you :)
 
  • jmichaelm

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Regarding the first two sentences, I think you can "quiver in anger", and I'm sure I've seen puppies "quiver with excitement."
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    When speaking of humans/animals:

    Quiver
    indicates a 'tight', high-frequency vibration. e.g. if you put a ruler on a table edge with half of the ruler beyond the edge, and bend the ruller and let it go, then, after the first, large vibrations, the ruler quivers.

    Tingle is subcutaneous and is felt, not seen.

    Tremble indicates a 'looser' lower frequency vibration, often irregular/uncontrolled. A person who is ill may hold out his hand and the hand trembles. Tremble is mainly associated with fear.

    Shake can be used with anger: it is more intense than tremble and tends to indicate that the 'trembler' will erupt into violence.

    I would not use "tingle with anger."
     

    GandalfMB

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian - Yellow Beach
    When speaking of humans/animals:

    Quiver
    indicates a 'tight', high-frequency vibration. e.g. if you put a ruler on a table edge with half of the ruler beyond the edge, and bend the ruller and let it go, then, after the first, large vibrations, the ruler quivers.

    Tingle is subcutaneous and is felt, not seen.

    Tremble indicates a 'looser' lower frequency vibration, often irregular/uncontrolled. A person who is ill may hold out his hand and the hand trembles. Tremble is mainly associated with fear.

    Shake can be used with anger: it is more intense than tremble and tends to indicate that the 'trembler' will erupt into violence.

    I would not use "tingle with anger."
    Thank you, Paul. I absolutely agree that tingle is subcutaneous and it can't be seen. At this point, can we say that "quiver" is stronger than "tingle"? A person quivering with excitement would be more excited than someone tingling with excitement. So, one can quiver with both, anger and excitement, is that correct?
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Quiver and tremble are both neutral with regards emotion - they are both simply describing physical movement (as Paul delineates). Tingle is a physical sensation that cannot be seen. Hooking these words together with emotions is an acceptable figurative use of them, and collocations are not restricted:D
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    In broad terms, tingle, as it is a feeling, can only be used by the person themselves or the narrator. Quiver is physical and not a word that occurs with great frequency, and these add to its power.

    Tingle is not really capable of being intensified to the same level as as "quiver." As the tingling grows to unbearable levels, it then manifests in trembling, shaking or quivering.

    Yes, one can quiver with both, anger and excitement. Tingling seems to be restricted to pleasurable things, intuition, and horror.
     

    GandalfMB

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian - Yellow Beach
    Thank you, gents. Before people burst into tears their lower lips usually quiver. A short, sharp, shaking movement. There's a person next to me and he things tremble and quiver are similar. Tremble is more continuous in my opinion. Quiver is more rapid than tremble. A cat's tail might quiver depending on its mood. I don't think that tremble and quiver are similar.
     

    Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    ...That's fine but don't we usually tingle with excitement and tremble with fear?...
    As far as the subjective sensation is concerned, fear and excitement are different. Physiologically the outward symptoms are much the same and depend on the level of arousal.
     
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