Quizá acierta...

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Trilalo

New Member
Greece, Greek
Hello everybody! Can you please help me with this?:

I do not completely unerstand the grammar that goes with quizá:eek:.
Is the this sentence correct??

"Quizá acierta y tiene razón en lo que dice"

Thank you!
 
  • Crescent

    Senior Member
    Russian, (Ukraine)
    Hello everybody! Can you please help me with this?:

    I do not completely unerstand the grammar that goes with quizá:eek:.
    Is the this sentence correct??

    "Quizá acierta y tiene razón en lo que dice"

    Thank you!
    Hi there. :)

    I'm sorry, but I'm not sure I understand what you mean by the ''grammar rule'' with ''quizá(s)''. Quizá is just a word which means ''maybe''. I'm not sure that there are any specific and individual grammar rules related to it...or if there are I'm not aware of them, sorry. :eek:
    Perhaps you meant where 'quizá' should stand in the sentence?
    Well, normally, it doesn't have a set position, but in your example it makes the most sense at the begining, where it was originally. :)
     

    I N C U B U S

    Member
    USA, English
    Well I think the tricky thing about quizá is simply if the verb that goes with it will take the subjunctive. I may be wrong, but I think it basically comes down to how much you think the action will actually happen. (If you're pretty sure, then indicative, not sure at all, then subjunctive)

    Someone correct me if I'm wrong please .
     

    Cracker Jack

    Senior Member
    Quizá always goes with subjunctive. The phrase that comes quizá presupposes is a hypothetical one and has yet to be realized, hence the use of subjunctive. However, if you use ''a lo mejor'' the verb is indicative.

    Subjunctive

    Quizá/s
    Tal vez
    Puede que
    Puede ser que
     

    bereborn!

    Senior Member
    colombia español
    Hello everybody! Can you please help me with this?:

    I do not completely unerstand the grammar that goes with quizá:eek:.
    Is the this sentence correct??

    "Quizá acierta y tiene razón en lo que dice"

    Thank you!
    hello!

    the setence in espanish is much better like this : "quiza acierta y tenga razon en lo que dice"
    ;)
     

    alumnisimo

    Senior Member
    english usa
    Quizá always goes with subjunctive. The phrase that comes quizá presupposes is a hypothetical one and has yet to be realized, hence the use of subjunctive. However, if you use ''a lo mejor'' the verb is indicative.

    Subjunctive

    Quizá/s
    Tal vez
    Puede que
    Puede ser que
    Segun lo que tu dices ..."Quizá acierta y tiene razón en lo que dice" está mal escrito. Debe de usar el subjunctivo. ¿verdad?
     

    alumnisimo

    Senior Member
    english usa
    Quizá always goes with subjunctive. The phrase that comes quizá presupposes is a hypothetical one and has yet to be realized, hence the use of subjunctive. However, if you use ''a lo mejor'' the verb is indicative.

    Subjunctive

    Quizá/s
    Tal vez
    Puede que
    Puede ser que
    Según lo que tu dices ..."Quizá acierta y tiene razón en lo que dice" está mal escrito. Debe de usar el subjunctivo. ¿verdad?
     

    Trilalo

    New Member
    Greece, Greek
    so, if I understood correctly, the most right sentence is "Quizá acierte y tenga razón en lo que dice."? And not "Quizá acierta..." because acierta is not subjunctive right??

    thanks very much for you help guys!!! :thumbsup: :D
     

    neal41

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    A search in Google of 'quizas tenga' and 'quizas tiene' and of 'tal vez tenga' and 'tal vez tiene' suggests that both variations are correct in the appropriate circumstances. The subjunctive version is 4-5 times more frequent that the indicative version. For non-native speakers it is difficult to know where the boundary between the two forms lies on the doubt scale. This boundary point may well vary with dialect. One solution is to use 'a lo mejor' which, as someone has already pointed out, always takes the indicative.
     
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