Quizá terminaré/termine (subjuntivo/indicativo)

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Art Martinez

New Member
Cuando escribo y hablo en español, tengo problemas con palabras o frases como quizá, hasta que, mientras, etc… más el subjuntivo o indicativo.


Cuando digo algo como

Indicativo: alta probabilidad, certidumbre

Quizá terminaré mi trabajo mañana.
Quizá habrá mucha gente en la fiesta.

Subjuntivo: Menos probabilidad, incertidumbre
Quizá termine mi trabajo mañana.
Quizá haya mucha gente en la fiesta.




Entonces, me pregunto si es posible volver a escribir las dos frases así y mantener el mismo significado:

  • Es probable que terminaré mi trabajo mañana.
  • Dudo que termine mi trabajo mañana.
  • Es probable que habrá mucha gente en la fiesta mañana.
  • Dudo que haya mucha gente en la fiesta mañana.
 
  • monarton

    Member
    Spanish - Spain
    • Es probable que terminaré mi trabajo mañana. :cross: suena raro
    • Dudo que termine mi trabajo mañana. :tick:
    • Es probable que habrá mucha gente en la fiesta mañana. - es mejor decir como "que haya" pero no suena tan raro
    • Dudo que haya mucha gente en la fiesta mañana. :tick:
     

    Art Martinez

    New Member
    Bueno, recuerdo que es obligatorio usar el subjuntivo con la frase "es probable"
    Entonces: Es probable que lo termine mañana.

    Es mejor porque todavía hay duda pero no tanto.
     

    ayuda?

    Senior Member
    The Subjunctive in Adverbial Clauses [Web site about these kinds of time expressions]
    [See: Section III. Adverbial conjunctions of time:]
    It’s a matter of 1) an anticipated situation and 2) one which is completed or usual.
    The Web site specifically contains some good examples with quizá, hasta que, mientras, etc.

    Re: Indicativo: alta probabilidad, certidumbre
    Quizá terminaré mi trabajo mañana.
    Quizá habrá mucha gente en la fiesta.


    Here, you are using the Future tense, so in that case you avoid using the Subjunctive.


    Re:
    Subjuntivo: Menos probabilidad, incertidumbre

    Quizá termine mi trabajo mañana.
    Quizá haya mucha gente en la fiesta.

    Now you are using the Present Subjunctive because you seem to be saying you’re not at all sure about this, as you said.


    **This is not you standard way of explaining these two-way conjunctions, but this is the way I think of a sentence like this in the Subjunctive:

    Subjunctive with Quizá: Quizá termine mi trabajo mañana.

    Maybe I would work tomorrow. [There is a lot of doubt about that—that’s why I used would, which is not exactly the way they explain it in grammar books. It might not be the best choice grammatically. But I’m just using it as an illustration [Doubt]. It just reflects my personal mood. I could just as well have used the simple Indicative. I made the choice because of my strong feelings about not doing that.

    Indicative with Quizá: Quizá termino mi trabajo mañana. [There’s more of a possibility I will]

    The list of other adverbial conjunctions of time—cuando, a medida que, en cuanto, etc. All fall into the same category, and it’s a good list to memorize.


    I hope you understand what I am trying to say here with would.
     
    Last edited:

    Elixabete

    Senior Member
    Basque
    En mi variante del castellano las versiones con el indicativo suenan distintivamente erroneas, nadie diría "quizá termino mi trabajo mañana". I can't see a significant difference in degree of certainty between quizá terminaré y quizá termine if you want to express higher probability you have other ways : probablemente terminaré mañana. A suggestion : use the subjunctive in all cases.
     

    Amapolas

    Senior Member
    Castellano rioplatense
    En las frases que pusiste con "es probable" y "dudo que" tienes que usar el subjuntivo sí o sí.
    "Quizá" es un poquito más flexible (no sé por qué); inclusive lo puedes usar con el indicativo presente para indicar futuro (quizá lo termino mañana).
    Sin embargo, como dice Elixabete, el subjuntivo es tu mejor opción, ya que funciona bien en todos estos caso.
     

    Sendro Páez

    Senior Member
    Spanish - España
    I agree with the rest of Spanish speakers who have contributed here: forget about the indicative, Art Martinez. A very important meaning of the verb tenses called 'presente de subjuntivo' and 'pretérito perfecto de subjuntivo' is future action, so don't care about certainty in these cases.

    I'd like to comment on this:
    The Subjunctive in Adverbial Clauses [Web site about these kinds of time expressions]
    [See: Section III. Adverbial conjunctions of time:]
    It’s a matter of 1) an anticipated situation and 2) one which is completed or usual.
    The Web site specifically contains some good examples with quizá, hasta que, mientras, etc.
    I'm afraid I haven't been able to find the word 'quizá' in the text so, although it contains a lot of useful things, it is not applicable to the present thread.

    That aside, there's a problem with that paper. As I said, it is very useful. It also is plenty of information and you can learn a lot through it but, by reaching the bottom of the page, you'll find out one worrying thing. It is what I'd call a signature. It consists of the name of a male person backed by the name and the address of a university. Well, that changes things a lot. After learning that information, my verdict must change. The text has some (just slightly) questionable statements, a number of flaws (along with a couple of typos), and it is crystal clear that its responsible (rather than author, because we all know how things work in a university) can't speak Spanish properly. I mean, their Spanish is as poor as my English, so their document doesn't possess the reliability I would expect from a university.

    The poor quality of the teaching and the learning of Spanish in the U.S concerns me a lot... and, as you may guess, it shouldn't, because it is not my concern!
     

    Milton Sand

    Senior Member
    Español (Colombia)
    Quizá terminaré mi trabajo mañana.
    Quizá habrá mucha gente en la fiesta.
    Hi,

    It sounds really weird with futuro del indicativo to my ears. However, in «quizá habrá mucha gente», I feel that the futuro del indicativo is being used to state a present conjecture, a theory that seems to be the logical conclusion: «Quizá habrá mucha gente en ese evento y, como odia los gentíos, ha regresado temprano a casa»; so I think I wouldn't use the tense in the first person, «quizá terminaré», unless I hope (and maybe fail) to mean a sort of sarcasm.

    Regards,
    ;)
     
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    Elixabete

    Senior Member
    Basque
    Even in your example I would use haya, quizá haya mucha gente...Sometimes things sound familiar or correct because too many people make the same mistake but it doesn't mean they are right.
     
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