quiz <from/for> Maths.

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Gerry905

Senior Member
U.K.
I've been wondering what's the correct way to say it:
"Tomorrow we will have a quiz for Maths" or "Tomorrow we will have a quiz from Maths" or something else?
- We had a quiz today!
- From what/For what? (What subject?)
- From/for English.

Thanks to everyone in advance!
 
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    Something else: you have a quiz on or about a subject. (Or a quiz in a lesson: a quiz in maths means a quiz in the maths lesson.)
     

    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    I've been wondering what's the correct way to say it:
    "Tomorrow we will have a quiz for Maths" or "Tomorrow we will have a quiz from Maths" or something else?
    - We had a quiz today!
    - From what/For what? (What subject?)
    - From/for English.
    "From/For In what?"
    "From/For In English."
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    I would not use a preposition in any of the examples, except if the quiz were about a limited area of study within a discipline.

    "Tomorrow we will have a Maths/English/History/Chemistry/etc. quiz." :tick:

    "Tomorrow we will have a quiz about the life of Winston Churchill/The Civil War/atonal Slavonian poetry."


    "Tomorrow we will have a quiz in English." Sounds as if quizzes are usually given using some other language, as opposed to English.
     

    Gerry905

    Senior Member
    U.K.
    Is "Maths" here intended to mean tomorrow's Maths lesson, Gerry?
    If so, is the quiz going to take up the whole of the lesson?
    These are two factors that could affect the wording.
    Yes, the quiz is going to take up the whole Maths lesson.
    I know that it's better to say "I'll have a Math quiz tomorrow." but if I were talking to someone and they said that they are going to have a quiz, and I want to know what is the subject they are going to have test should I say:
    Friend: We are going to have a quiz tomorrow.
    Me: For/in what?

    Friend: For/in History, Maths, Philosophy etc.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    I'm just wondering why you thought the version you had in brackets wasn't acceptable. I think I would in fact say 'What subject?' or 'Which subject?'

    'What on?' works, but it could be ambiguous, because I'd think of it as referring to a topic than a subject - eg​ trigonometry or quadratic equations, rather than just maths.
     
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