quota (Hong Kong English)

< Previous | Next >

peter199083

Senior Member
Mandarin
I recently found that people in Hong Kong tend to use the word 'quota'. The examples include:
1. a former thread titled 'quota of available places' and similarly a university module selection system, in both cases I would just say 'available places';
2. When I was queuing up for Hong Kong identification card registration, the officer put up a poster saying 'Full Quota', implying the places for the walk-in registration (without appointment) are full. I felt that 'full quota' sounds wired and I would use 'no vacancies'.
At least when I was studying in the UK, I never came across it. Thereby I doubt if 'quota' is daily-spoken English, albeit it exists in dictionaries. Do you use the word regularly?
 
  • sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I don't use the word "quota" regularly - but I am not in an environment where I might need to use the word regularly.
    I have never seen a poster saying 'Full Quota', and I don't believe this expression is one of the usual BrE ways of saying that there are no more places available.
     

    peter199083

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    One way 'quota' is used, according to our WR dictionary:
    a prescribed number or quantity, ..., or students admitted to a college
    In terms of admitted students, I would say 'places offered' or 'places to be offered', depending upon the statistics is collected after or before the admission. Anyway 'quota' does not sound good. The only way I can accept it is that in a planned economy quota of food or meat is prescribed in which BrE speakers must not be familiar with.
     
    Last edited:

    Dexta

    Senior Member
    English (British and Australian)
    I see, hear and read the word quota regularly.

    In many academic institutions the number of offers is often slightly higher than the maximum quota on enrolments because there is typically a 3-5% rejection of offers or offers not returned, so these are two different numbers and there are two different terms to describe them accurately.
     

    peter199083

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    I see, hear and read the word quota regularly.
    Thank you for telling me.
    In many academic institutions the number of offers is often slightly higher than the maximum quota on enrolments because there is typically a 3-5% rejection of offers or offers not returned, so these are two different numbers and there are two different terms to describe them accurately.
    I think there are three numbers we are talking about: 'places to be offered', 'places offered' and 'places admitted' in terms of time sequence. Is 'places to be offered' what you call 'quota' down under?
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top