Quote/quotation

Packard

Senior Member
USA, English
Context:

I am slow to adopt new word usages. Just this year I started to us "Fax" in place of "facsimile" because my use of "facsimile" was confusing to some.

I still use "quotation" when I refer to one of the price quotations I send to a customers.

It seems that all the rest of the world uses "quote" for that application.

Examples:

Attached you will find our quotation on your part number #XYZ.

Attached you will find our quote on your part number #XYZ.


Question:

Are they both considered "correct"? Is it time for me to drop the "quotation" and get with the "quote"?
 
  • Toadie

    Senior Member
    English
    The word you're looking for is definitely "quote". There are instances when "quotation" and "quote" are nearly synonymous, but this is not one of them.

    Also, "number #_____" is redundant. The pound symbol (#) means "number".
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    The word you're looking for is definitely "quote". There are instances when "quotation" and "quote" are nearly synonymous, but this is not one of them.

    Also, "number #_____" is redundant. The pound symbol (#) means "number".
    I don't know that I can agree.

    See: http://www.thefreedictionary.com/quotation

    Specifically the definition "4".

    4.
    a. The quoting of current prices and bids for securities and goods.
    b. The prices or bids cited.

    In reference to the part number #...

    When I reference to a customer's part number I always say, "Part number" and then type the number exactly as it was written in the request for quotation. So sometimes it is Part number "#432", and some times is it Part number "P/N 432", and some times it is Part number "432".

    As our quotation form has a part number and a part description as identifiers for the parts, I use those as titles for the parts.

    This is simply a way to standardize our format for quoting purposes.
     

    Toadie

    Senior Member
    English
    Hmm... That definition is interesting to me. I have never heard it used that way. But then again, I'm young and I've been wrong before (of course).

    I guess I stand corrected!
     

    Aidanriley

    Senior Member
    English
    Hmm... That definition is interesting to me. I have never heard it used that way. But then again, I'm young and I've been wrong before (of course).

    I guess I stand corrected!
    I am inclined to agree with you. One can cite a dictionary until the cows come home, but they don't do a whole lot of justice for practical use/societal norms. I have never heard "quotation" used in this regard and I probably wouldn't understand it if I did. I'd use "quote".
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I am inclined to agree with you. One can cite a dictionary until the cows come home, but they don't do a whole lot of justice for practical use/societal norms. I have never heard "quotation" used in this regard and I probably wouldn't understand it if I did. I'd use "quote".

    I was taught that "quote" was a verb; "quotation" was a noun. Is that no longer the case?
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Like you, Mr P, I think this is something that has changed over time. In the dim and distant past, I wouldn't have dreamed of using quote for quotation; now I do it routinely.

    That might of course be partly because I am a lousy typist, and five letters is easier to type than nine.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Like you, Mr P, I think this is something that has changed over time. In the dim and distant past, I wouldn't have dreamed of using quote for quotation; now I do it routinely.

    That might of course be partly because I am a lousy typist, and five letters is easier to type than nine.
    And 3 letters is easier to type than five:

    Joy!

    It doesn't express the point, and it is clearly off-topic, but it is Christmas time and I think I'll test the moderators' Christmas spirit.

    Merry Christmas. And thanks for the replies.

    Packard
     

    berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    I am inclined to agree with you. One can cite a dictionary until the cows come home, but they don't do a whole lot of justice for practical use/societal norms. I have never heard "quotation" used in this regard and I probably wouldn't understand it if I did. I'd use "quote".
    So am I. From my experience in the financial services industry (17 years) I is much more natural for me saying "quote" when referring to a quoted price and using "quotation" for the act of quoting.


    You hear or read people saying or writing "to give a quotation" rather than "to give a quote" but this is relatively infrequent and if you encounter "to give a quotation", "quotation" often refers to a "document containing (a) quote(s)" rather than just to the bare number.
     
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