r- and -rr- in Portugal

  • Alirhotic

    Senior Member
    Brazilian Portuguese
    They're pronouced like spanish J (juego, mujer, etc).

    About R in caRta, poRta, faRsa, it depends on the accent. Portuguese from Portugal will spell it like in Spanish, with a slight vibrant R. In some Brazilians regions too, but in general it is like a subtle Spanish J.
     

    portumania

    Banned
    TR cypriot
    I am listening to SIC news (Lisbon) and I can not understand the sound of words starting with r- or having -rr-. Is it like spanish "j"? or like spanish "g" (like in luego) or it is like a french r?
     

    jpyvr

    Senior Member
    English - Canadian
    Based on how those letters are spoken here in Northeastern Brazil, I'd go with your Spanish "j", or an aspirated English "h". Single "r" between vowels is pronounced like a Spanish single "r."

    Incidentally, a single "r", mid-word, at a syllable break is also pronounced like initial "r" and "rr". For example, a friend of mine has the name Israel, which is pronounced: IS-HA-EW.
     

    helenag

    New Member
    Portuguese - Brazil
    They're pronouced like spanish J (juego, mujer, etc).

    About R in caRta, poRta, faRsa, it depends on the accent. Portuguese from Portugal will spell it like in Spanish, with a slight vibrant R. In some Brazilians regions too, but in general it is like a subtle Spanish J.
    I do not think this happens in general. Of course, in Rio de Janeiro it is pronounced like this, and also in the city I live, Florianópolis, by the people who have the local accent. I'm almost certain that in the Northeastern states it is pronounced like that as well.

    But in Rio Grande do Sul these "R"s are pronounced as in Portugal, and in most of Santa Catarina and Paraná also, if I'm not wrong. In Rio Grande do Sul, some people who have strong accent pronounce it like the -rr- in the Spanish word "carro".

    In São Paulo, it is sometimes pronounced as the English R (like in "park", "fork", "period").

    So, this is something that depends on the region... If I had to guess, I'd say most people in Brazil speak it as in Portugal. But I might as well be wrong. :) :confused:
     

    anaczz

    Senior Member
    Português (Brasil)
    Não percebo muito de fonética, mas, em geral, acho a pronúncia do R inicial em Portugal muito diferente do que vejo no Brasil (inclusive no Paraná e Santa Catarina). Em Portugal a o R é bem gutural (ou seria uvular?), de uma forma que sou incapaz de reproduzir sem que me doa a garganta! E no Brasil o som parece ser mais palatal.
    Quem entende de fonética para dizer se estou a falar bobagem?

    Obs.: Tenho pouco contato com gaúchos, mas o R gaúcho sempre me pareceu que, embora mais sonoro que o R paulista, tem o som produzido com a vibração da língua.
     

    helenag

    New Member
    Portuguese - Brazil
    Não percebo muito de fonética, mas, em geral, acho a pronúncia do R inicial em Portugal muito diferente do que vejo no Brasil (inclusive no Paraná e Santa Catarina). Em Portugal a o R é bem gutural (?) de uma forma que sou incapaz de reproduzir sem que me doa a garganta! E no Brasil o som parece ser mais palatal.
    Quem entende de fonética para dizer se estou a falar bobagem?
    Talvez eu não tenha percebido tão bem o R de Portugal... Me perdoem se falei besteira.
     

    MOC

    Senior Member
    Portuguese
    My other question was general. This was specific about Lisbon (SIC) accent

    The thing with the "R" is that as Outsider said you may hear it pronounced both ways in Portugal.

    The two pronounciations can be heard, and neither is an isolated thing. There's the one that is somewhat close to the spanish "j" or french "R" and then there's the one that sounds like spanish "R".

    If you had to pick one I'd suggest the first one, since the other one although very popular and used by a lot of speakers in rural areas, specially in the north, may not be as common in Lisbon.

    However, that is not to say you won't hear it in Lisbon too, even because people from rural areas often move to bigger cities in search of employment and it doesn't get any bigger than Lisbon.
     

    Nino83

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Olá a todos.
    Quando vejo os programas da RTP ouço que algumas vezes a erre inicial e a erre erre é pronunciada como em italiano e em espanhol ([r]ua, ca[rr]o).
    O que queria perguntar é se esta pronúncia é típica de algumas regiões do Portugal. Vocês podem intuir de onde é quem fala com este tipo de pronúncia?

    Ciao
     

    mexerica feliz

    Senior Member
    português nordestino
    Vocês podem intuir de onde é quem fala com este tipo de pronúncia?
    De Angola.
    ;) Em português angolano R e RR se usam como em espanhol,
    porque refletem a pronúncia lusitana antiga (antes do ano de 1974).
    Em Portugal de hoje, essa pronúncia soa antiga (tipo: usada por pessoas velhas)
    ou regional (por exemplo: usada nas regiões isoladas, como Trás-os-Montes).
     

    Drink

    Senior Member
    English - New England, Russian - Moscow
    I was just listening to Amália Rodrigues's song "Uma Casa Portuguesa". It seems to me that in it, she pronounces "está nesta grande riqueza" with a Spanish "r", but "duas rosas num jardim" with a French "r". I have noticed that in most of her songs, she uses the Spanish "r", even though she was from Lisbon, where they use the French "r".
     

    Nino83

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Origado mexerica pela resposta.
    Sim, xiskxisk, a erre tradicional portuguesa é mais similar à erre italiana do que a erre espanhola. A erre espanhola é uma vibrante simple [ɾ] pelo contrário a erre portuguesa e italiana (em palavras como rua, ruota) é uma vibrante multipla [r].
    @Drink, Amália Rodriguez usa a [r] também nas palavras [r]ua, [r]apazote, [r]ibeira, [r]osmaninho, [r]apariga. É a sua pronúncia mais comum.
    Ela usa a [rr] em palavras como sorrateira, terra.
     
    Last edited:

    xiskxisk

    Senior Member
    European Portuguese
    I was just listening to Amália Rodrigues's song "Uma Casa Portuguesa". It seems to me that in it, she pronounces "está nesta grande riqueza" with a Spanish "r", but "duas rosas num jardim" with a French "r". I have noticed that in most of her songs, she uses the Spanish "r", even though she was from Lisbon, where they use the French "r".
    Por algum motivo que desconheço é comum usar-se a pronúncia do r tradicional nas músicas.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top