rabbit meat?

Discussion in 'English Only' started by pink_devil, Mar 17, 2010.

  1. pink_devil Member

    Bulgarian
    Hello everyone,

    Meat from a pig is pork; from a cow is beef...etc. Could you please tell me if there is a certain word about the rabbit meat?
    Thanks!
     
  2. Barque Senior Member

    India
    Tamil
    As far as I know, no. It's just called rabbit meat.
     
  3. Copyright

    Copyright Senior Member

    Penang
    American English
    Bunny beef? Just joking... I think you'll have to dine on rabbit meat -- I've never heard any other term (just as chicken is chicken). If you're serving it, you can leave off the meat, "I hope you'll enjoy the wild rabbit I've prepared for you."
     
  4. pink_devil Member

    Bulgarian
    Great, thanks!It's because I was teaching the kinds of meat and I was asked that question- I didn't think it does have a special name, but wanted to make sure-sure. :)
    Thanks again!
     
  5. sdgraham

    sdgraham Senior Member

    Oregon, USA
    USA English
    I found this a fascinating question so I hopped right to it. 'ear's one source of recipes that just calls it "rabbit."

    See HERE.
     
  6. sb70012

    sb70012 Senior Member

    Persian
    1. I love rabbit meat.
    2. I love rabbit's meat.

    Hello friends,

    Would you please be kind enough to tell me which one is grammatically correct?
    Should I use a possessive noun?

    (I searched for it in the forum but couldn't
    find a thread related to my question
    )
    Source: self made grammar question
    Thank you
     
    Last edited: Oct 29, 2013
  7. sdgraham

    sdgraham Senior Member

    Oregon, USA
    USA English
    It's just as written in this existing thread :)

    rabbit meat?
     
  8. e2efour Senior Member

    England (aged 75)
    UK English
    I don't think I've ever seen rabbit meat on sale at a supermarket, to say nothing of chicken meat, pig meat etc.
     
  9. sdgraham

    sdgraham Senior Member

    Oregon, USA
    USA English
    I think you mean that you've never seen it called that, no? (rather than not being able to buy chicken, rabbit or pork):)
     
  10. e2efour Senior Member

    England (aged 75)
    UK English
    I mean I would never call it "rabbit meat" since I have no need for this expression (and I have never heard anyone call rabbit rabbit meat).
     
  11. Copyright

    Copyright Senior Member

    Penang
    American English
    A quick search of Google will show a variety of sources that use rabbit meat. I wouldn't be surprised to see "meat" attached to any animal that is not the usual pork, beef and chicken, e.g. rattlesnake meat, horsemeat, ostrich meat, rat meat. I see it as reinforcement that it's meant for human consumption.
     
  12. JustKate

    JustKate Moderate Mod

    My husband grew up eating rabbit meat (it's too gamey for me), and he always just calls it "rabbit."
     
  13. Copyright

    Copyright Senior Member

    Penang
    American English
    Just to clarify, my comments were about retail sales. I think once you get the meat home, you would refer to it as rabbit, ostrich, rattlesnake and rat ... don't know about horse, never having brought one to the table. :)
     
  14. JustKate

    JustKate Moderate Mod

    I've merged the two rabbit threads. So hop to it, kids. :)
     
  15. natkretep

    natkretep Moderato con anima (English Only)

    Singapore
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Fresh rabbit is often sold whole, so you would usually talk about buying rabbit (rather than rabbit meat). I have bough frozen rabbit before (cut up, rather than whole), and I think it was retailed as 'frozen rabbit' (rather than 'rabbit meat'). (In other words, I'm in agreement with e2efour.)

    For a related discussion on goat meat, see
    [h=1]Goat meat [word?][/h]
     
  16. sb70012

    sb70012 Senior Member

    Persian
    Hello again,

    I know that we should say "beef" instead of the meat of a cow.
    and
    I know that we should say "pork" instead of the meat of a pig.

    But but if we specify them?

    I mean:
    1. cow meat or (cow milk)
    2. cow's meat or (cow's milk)
    3. pig meat or (pig milk)
    4. pig's meat or (pig's milk)

    I think according to "rabbit meat" only number 1 and 3 are correct. Am I right?
     
  17. sdgraham

    sdgraham Senior Member

    Oregon, USA
    USA English
  18. sb70012

    sb70012 Senior Member

    Persian
    Thank you but what about "meat"?
    Is it like "rabbit meat" order?
    I mean can we say "cow meat" or "pig meat"?
     
  19. e2efour Senior Member

    England (aged 75)
    UK English
    If you are asking about compound nouns of the type noun plus noun, the second of which is meat, then it is true that we can create them by putting the name of the animal first, without the apostrophe.
    But there are some words in English where we do not do this, although we can theoretically. These are the meat of dead animals. The meat has a special name that English has taken from French. These names include beef, pork, mouton (meat from a sheep), venison (deer) etc.

    With the exception of these words, when we eat or buy meat, we use the name of the living animal. So we eat rabbit, horse and crab, for example. We could also eat or buy hedgehog, armadillo, python etc. if the supermarket sold this type of meat.

    We do not normally add "meat", except in a few words like crabmeat and horsemeat.
     
  20. Che11e

    Che11e New Member

    English
    In the animal kingdom, it's called Leporide. For consumption it is referred to as Fryer or Roaster, though I have seen it in my market listed simply "rabit".
     
  21. PaulQ

    PaulQ Senior Member

    UK
    English - England
    There was a word for rabbit meat which I think would be understandable today: "coney". In the same way that beef, pork, venison all are from the French, so was coney.

    OED:
    Mmmmm... water rat... :D
     
  22. Keith Bradford

    Keith Bradford Senior Member

    Brittany, NW France
    English (Midlands UK)
    The reason we have distinctive words for the meat of the ox, sheep or pig (plus deer and chickens - venison and poultry) is that in the generations following the Norman invasion (1066) the wealthy classes spoke French, and called these boeuf, mouton and porc, venaison and pouletterie. The etymology is clear.

    But I surmise that by and large they didn't eat rabbit, which (like oxtail, sheep's head and pig's trotters) was peasant food. So the nobles and their French-speaking chefs didn't get round to calling rabbit-meat lapin. The French-origin word coney still exists, but is used in the vocabulary of law and heraldry, not cooking.
     
  23. PaulQ

    PaulQ Senior Member

    UK
    English - England
    You'd be wrong,
    (Although I'm not too sure about the "reintroduction") Normans / Medieval - food facts - History cookbook - Cookit!
     
  24. Keith Bradford

    Keith Bradford Senior Member

    Brittany, NW France
    English (Midlands UK)
    Knowing what little I do about the behaviour of rabbits and peasants, I doubt the complete accuracy of "rare and expensive items kept in specially built warrens". They (the animals I mean!) dig deep and they breed like... well...

    According to Romans introduced the rabbit "Years of division among academics over whether the Romans or the Normans introduced rabbits into Britain appears to have been resolved. An archaeological dig in Norfolk has uncovered the remains of a 2,000-year-old rabbit - by far the oldest of its kind found on these shores and regarded as final proof that the creatures are now on the list of what the Romans ever did for us."
     
  25. Andygc

    Andygc Senior Member

    Devon
    British English
    Did you mean the order "Leporidae", which includes all rabbits and hares? "Leporide" usually refers to a type of hare that is alleged to be a rabbit-hare hybrid although I understand that all attested attempts to cross rabbits and hares have failed. I've eaten rabbit fairly often, and in all the shops I've seen it for sale in Britain it's been called "rabbit".

    Paul, "reintroduction" referring to organised warrens seems fair. I doubt that the British maintained the ones the Romans built in Britain before their empire collapsed.

    Cross-posted. I see KB was Googling as I typed. I'm surprised there was any controversy about the Romans building warrens - I thought that was documented by the Romans themselves.
     
  26. Hermione Golightly

    Hermione Golightly Senior Member

    London
    British English
    No, we native speakers don't, so of course you shouldn't, talk about cow meat, pig meat, sheep meat, rabbit meat, crocodile meat, ostrich meat, deer meat, boar meat, snake meat, snail meat, or frog meat.
    (Except, maybe, and sometimes, in very specific and rather unusual contexts, such as comparing the taste of flesh/meat.)

    I've not read of any evidence that the Romano-British or Anglo- Saxons farmed rabbits for the table. Rabbit is still rarely eaten in the UK, although recently it's gained popularity in some fancy restaurants. Many British regard rabbit with the same revulsion as horsemeat, snails and frogs, to name only items that are commonly eaten in the European mainland.
    We love rabbit and I cooked it from time to time when we lived in France and Switzerland, using the classic French recipes, with prunes and armagnac, or mustard, sauces.
     

Share This Page

Loading...