Rachel is no more courageous than Saul (is).

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SuprunP

Senior Member
Ukrainian & Russian
15.70

Rachel is no more courageous than Saul (is).
The sentence implies that both Rachel and Saul are not courageous ('Rachel is not courageous, any more than Saul is courageous').
[...]
Rachel is not more courageous than Saul (is).
This last sentence allows for the possibility that Rachel is less courageous than Saul.

(A Comprehensive Grammar of the English Language; R. Quirk)

Would you be so kind as to tell me whether I have understood it correctly that 'Rachel is no more courageous than Saul (is).' does not allow for the possibility that Rachel is less courageous than Saul?

Thanks.
 
  • Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    It doesn't necessarily mean that Rachel is less courageous, only that she isn't courageous and is similar to Saul in this respect. I wouldn't say that it doesn't allow for the possibility that she is less courageous; it just doesn't specify that.
     
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