Rachel was wee [= Rachel was early?]

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destinywizard

New Member
English - United States
Wee means very early or little, but in the context: "Rachel ran in the wee hours of the morning.", it means very early.

Is it grammatically correct to say "Rachel was wee to the graduation ceremony." (Replaced: Rachel was very early to the graduation ceremony)?

I'm undecided on whether it is or isn't grammatically correct because another way of saying it is... "Rachel arrived very early to the graduation ceremony.", then replacing "very early" with "wee" would sound odd.

Thank you.
 
  • PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Wee means very early or little, but in the context: "Rachel ran in the wee hours of the morning.", it means very early.
    No, wee does not mean "early" - wee (adj.) always means "small".

    the wee hours of the morning. = the small hours of the morning. 'The small hours' are between midnight and about 4 o'clock. (Because the numbers of the hours - 1,2,3 - are small...)
    Is it grammatically correct to say "Rachel was wee to the graduation ceremony."
    Wee means small.
    because another way of saying it is... "Rachel arrived very early to the graduation ceremony."
    That is correct.
    then replacing "very early" with "wee" would sound odd.
    - not only odd - it would be wrong.
     

    destinywizard

    New Member
    English - United States
    No, wee does not mean "early" - wee (adj.) always means "small".

    the wee hours of the morning. = the small hours of the morning. 'The small hours' are between midnight and about 4 o'clock. (Because the numbers of the hours - 1,2,3 - are small...)
    Wee means small.

    That is correct.
    - not only odd - it would be wrong.
    Ït is "grammatically" correct, but total nonsense. You cannot drop the "hours."

    Our dictionary references here are misleading.:oops:

    Sorry.

    [cross-posted]
    I had a feeling that it would fail to make sense if one had said: "He was wee to the party." Thanks for the confirmation and time, cheers!
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    I wouldn't understand you. I might have thought you were talking about urination. (Using wee rather than pee is common in BrE.) :D
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    We believe in economy of words! And it's for children and grown-ups too. And it's a noun and a verb.

    (Oh, and if it was just 'Rachel was wee', I'd have thought this mean Rachel was titchy (OK that's another BrE word) or diminutive.)
     
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