rail strike/ train strike

  • Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    Is the expression "train strike" widely understood?
    Which one do you prefer to use, "rail strike" or "train strike"?
    I would quite happily use either. Since neither the rails nor the trains are actually striking, I don't really see why anyone would insist that one is right and the other is wrong.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    "Train strike' is obvious and seems to have significant usage, according to a Google search.
    I would not use it, but that's just a personal preference..
    Note that "railroad strike" and "railway strike" also are used.
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    I would quite happily use either. Since neither the rails nor the trains are actually striking, I don't really see why anyone would insist that one is right and the other is wrong.
    I agree. In London we have 'tube strikes' as well and 'bus strikes' are not uncommon all over the UK, I'm sure.

    And you say 'train strike' is referred to as a common mistake in an IELTS book? Rubbish.:)
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    And you say 'train strike' is referred to as a common mistake in an IELTS book? Rubbish.
    I don't think Mnemon is suggesting that - here's the relevant section from what I take to be the textbook concerned, IELTS With Masters:
    I'll have to walk to work during the train strike.​
    I'll have to walk at work during the train strike.​


    I agree with everyone else that "train strike" works.
     

    Chasint

    Senior Member
    English - England
    "Railroad strike" is what I'd be most likely to use.
    1. Note that, in Britain, we never use the word 'railroad' to refer to our trains.

    2. I see a rail strike as referring to any or all of the workers. A train strike would refer to a stoppage or more likely a reduction in the number of train journeys.
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    Moderator note

    Can I please ask that answers in this thread focus on what we would call a strike involving railways/railroads, and not whether the textbook had a mistake in it or not.

    Thanks! DonnyB - moderator.
     

    Linkway

    Senior Member
    British English
    In the UK, "rail strike" and "train strike" are commonly used if such a very rare event occurs or is threatened.

    Fortunately, when pilots withdraw their labour, we don't call it an "air strike". :eek:
     
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    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Yes.:D You reminded me of something that happened to me at work. A colleague of mine had to reply to an email from another colleague in Japan. It was rather complicated and contained elements pertaining to my job as well which he knew little about so he asked me to check it over. At the end of the email he had added a note saying that he would have to delay his trip to Japan because of an 'air strike' (a literal translation from the Italian). Obviously, I corrected it to 'plane strike' and explained why. He was very grateful to me.:D
     
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