"Raise a siege"

NewAmerica

Senior Member
Mandarin
Supposed that you are under siege (by some people who are ignorant of the truth and facts), you try your best to raise the siege by showing them the truth and facts. Finally the people release you.

My question is whether I've used "raise the siege" correctly here.

Should it me "life the siege"?

Thanks in advance.
 
Last edited:
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    To my knowledge, you would raise your own siege, not someone else's. Same with "lift the siege." I'll also say that I've never had need to use this expression in my lifetime.

    I think the idea of your being under siege in an argument is going a bit far with the warlike descriptions. :)

    You can try your best to rebut their arguments until they finally agree or give up.
     

    NewAmerica

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    Inspiring.

    I should have introduced more context.

    The situation is that you travel to a city new to you, only to find that you are under siege by local people who mistake you as another official who has treated the people cruelly. Using your excellent negotiation skill, you convince the people that you are not that corrupted official and thus you raise the siege.

    Is the phrase "raise the siege" used correctly here?
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Not for me. You don't raise someone else's siege – you raise your own siege. And since you have launched any siege, I don't think it's appropriate here.

    Someone else may have a different viewpoint, of course, so you might want to wait a while. :)
     

    NewAmerica

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    Is "break the siege" suitable there?

    ...you convince the people that you are not that corrupted official and thus you break the siege.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Not for me. You don't raise someone else's siege – you raise your own siege.
    I can't agree with you on that. A siege can be raised by the besieger, but it can also be raised by a relief force, friendly to the besieged. British imperial history is full of incidents of sieges being raised in that way.
    I think the idea of your being under siege in an argument is going a bit far with the warlike descriptions.
    But I agree wholly with that.
    Is "break the siege" suitable there?

    ...you convince the people that you are not that corrupted official and thus you break the siege.
    :( I suggest that you follow Copyright's excellent advice and do not try to use "siege" as a metaphor in this context.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I can't agree with you on that. A siege can be raised by the besieger, but it can also be raised by a relief force, friendly to the besieged. British imperial history is full of incidents of sieges being raised in that way.
    I agree with the broader view ... I was focused on the fact that the people under siege can't raise the siege themselves. Thanks.
     
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