Raising children: how... ?

ThomasK

Senior Member
Belgium, Dutch
Don't worry: I am not asking about how to raise children, but only for your equivalent of the work (task...) of the parents.

(a) We want to ... [VERB, like raise] our children well.
(b) We want to give them a good ... [NOUN, upbringing? Education?]

In Dutch:
(a) we "feed" them "up", literally: opvoeden.
(b) We give them een goede opvoeding.

As usual, I am interested in the precise word or metaphor used... So please add a little explanation.
 
  • symposium

    Senior Member
    Italian - Italy
    In Italian we use the verb "crescere" (to grow); when used intransitively, without an object, it means "to grow up": "i bambini sono cresciuti = the kids have grown up". With cattle we use "allevare" and with crops we use "coltivare": allevare il bestiame = to raise cattle / coltivare il frumento = to grow wheat.
    In Venetian we say "slevare", the same verb used with cattle:
    English: She's raised two children
    Italian: Ha cresciuto due figli
    Venetian: La ga slevà do fioi
     
    ^^Likewise in Greek; we use the verb «μεγαλώνω» [me.ɣaˈlɔ.nɔ] which when used intransitively means to grow old/up/bigger, increase, but when used with an object it means to raise, bring up, make bigger < Classical denominative v. «μεγαλύνω» mĕgălúnō --> to magnify, extol < Classical adj. «μέγας» mégăs. E.g:
    «Μεγαλώνω τρία παιδιά» [me.ɣaˈlɔ.nɔ ˈtri.a peˈðʲa] --> I raise three children.
    «Μεγαλώνω πνευματικά» [me.ɣaˈlɔ.nɔ pnev.ma.tiˈka] --> I grow spiritually.
     

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    So, we recognize parallels indeed:
    - raising, bring up: we have "grootbrengen" (to bring [to become] big, mega... ): I always associate that with responsibility, adulthood, taking in charge, but of course "groot" is like /mega/
    We have a specific verb for growing animals, kweken, but in dialects we sometimes use it for children. I gather the /mega/ word is quite general, or isn't it?

    @symposium: would you have an idea of the etymology of slevare? I could imagine it refers to élever in French (s-levare, é-lever), so lifting up somehow...

    BTW: I suppose your nouns all refer to the same root as the verb, or don't they?
     

    symposium

    Senior Member
    Italian - Italy
    Well, all these verbs (élever, allevare, slevare) come from Latin "levare" (to raise) plus some preposition (ad-/ex- = up/ out). I suppose "slevare" comes from "exlevare" with the dropping of the initial "e", as it is always the case in Italian.
     

    Circunflejo

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Castilla
    A would be criar (from Latin creare) in Spanish. B is trickier because crianza is rarely used in that context.
     
    ^^Likewise in Greek; we use the verb «μεγαλώνω» [me.ɣaˈlɔ.nɔ] which when used intransitively means to grow old/up/bigger, increase, but when used with an object it means to raise, bring up, make bigger < Classical denominative v. «μεγαλύνω» mĕgălúnō --> to magnify, extol < Classical adj. «μέγας» mégăs. E.g:
    «Μεγαλώνω τρία παιδιά» [me.ɣaˈlɔ.nɔ ˈtri.a peˈðʲa] --> I raise three children.
    «Μεγαλώνω πνευματικά» [me.ɣaˈlɔ.nɔ pnev.ma.tiˈka] --> I grow spiritually.
    Apologies for quoting myself, but I forgot the noun, it's «ανατροφή» [a.na.trɔˈfi] (fem.) --> upbringing, rearing, nurturing < Classical deverbative fem. noun «ἀνατροφή» ănătrŏpʰḗ --> education, rearing, nurturing, feeding, diet, o-grade of Classical v. «ἀνατρέφω» ănătrépʰō --> to bring up, cherish, educate, feed up = compound, prefix and preposition «ἀνά» ănắ + v. «τρέφω» trépʰō --> to make fat, feed, bring up, care for (of unclear etymology, if IE then it's cognate with the Ger. Träber, pomace, Eng. draff, dregs, Dt. draf < Proto-Germanic *drabaz).
    The v. «ανατρέφω» can be used instead of «μεγαλώνω» in MoGr too, but it's considered bookish nowadays, if not highbrowed.
     

    Circunflejo

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Castilla
    @Circunflejo : criar is another basic metaphor, I suppose, creating. Had not thought crianza had to do with creation...
    I think so. We have crecer (equivalent to Italian crescere) but the kids themselves are the ones who crecen. You don't creces them. The compound hacer crecer (literally to make grow) wouldn't work either because the meaning would have different connotations... Criar is the usual verb. On the other hand, itsn't not usual to say that you gave your kids a good crianza although it's technically possible to say it.
     

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    Interesting... [This is probably not to the point, but what kind of crianza is this: La crianza puede ser muy peligrosa para la salud de un semental?]

    Just by the way: I suppose educación has to do with teaching mainly. I think éducation in French could refer to raising children as well.
     

    Circunflejo

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Castilla
    This is probably not to the point, but what kind of crianza is this: La crianza puede ser muy peligrosa para la salud de un semental?
    Most likely the period in which the animal eats from his mother.
    Just by the way: I suppose educación has to do with teaching mainly.
    In that context, educación relates with teaching and relates with good-manners.
     
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