Ramrod-style & Peck’s Big Boy-style

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Stephen Schmidt

Senior Member
Arabic
<...> When folks with a thirst did come in from the bus station for a beer or a highball, they sensed nothing out of the ordinary in the Falcon at all—there were a lot of guys, sure, but that was no different than thousands of workingmen’s bars all across the country. The clientele was gay, but gay was not a synonym for stupid. If they wanted a little outrageousness, they went to Portland. If they wanted a lot of outrageousness—Ramrod-style outrageousness or Peck’s Big Boy-style outrageousness—they went down to New York or Boston. <-----Excess quote removed by moderator (Florentia52)----->
Hi.
This is from It by Stephen King. What do Ramrod-style and Peck's Big Boy-style mean?
Context: Falcon--a bar whose clients are gay.
Thanks in advance.
 
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  • Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I wonder if King is misremembering the term "Peck's Bad Boy", which originates in a series of 19th Century books about a misbehaving youth.
    There is a large chain of restaurants (much smaller than it was in the 1970s when King wrote this) called "Big Boy". Depending on what part of the country you were in, the restaurants were called "Bob's Big Boy", "Kip's Big Boy", "Vip's Big Boy", and quite a few others.
    Big Boy Restaurants - Wikipedia
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    That's a little harsh - the names are there for a reason... and without explaining that reason, the fact that they are bar names does not seem to enlighten the OP. ;)
    I did not mean my statement to be harsh, but it is very incorrect to say that these terms refer to "overt sexual practices", as opposed to the names of very well-known bars.

    The sentence means that the Falcon was not an "outrageous" gay bar. If people in town wanted to go to a gay bar that was a little outrageous, they went to Portland, and if they wanted a gay bar that was very outrageous, along the lines of the Ramrod or other notorious gay bars, they went to the cities where such bars are found: that is, New York, or Boston (which, by the way, also had a gay bar called the Ramrod.) Both the Boston and the New York bars would have been widely known by many people, and not merely the gay community, in part because they had a titillating name and were in highly visible locations on heavily travelled streets (West Street in New York, Boylston Street in Boston, just a block from Fenway Park), but mostly because the 1980 shootings at the Ramrod in New York would still have been widely remembered in the northeastern US in 1986 when It was written.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    The sentence means
    I am aware what the sentence means but the names in question were a bit of an added bonus to my conclusion when they turned out to be actual bars.
    I did not mean my statement to be harsh, but it is very incorrect to say that these terms refer to "overt sexual practices", as opposed to the names of very well-known bars.
    Could we agree that both are true and that Ramrod and Peck’s were not named by innocents abroad? The imagery is graphic...
     
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