ran by / run by ??

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andy7755

Member
England / English
Hi Everybody!

In English, which of the following is correct?

the shop is ran by nice people

or

the shop is run by nice people

I think the first one is grammatically correct but as, when speaking, we use both, I'm not sure which one to write.

Any help??
 
  • Agnès E.

    Senior Member
    France, French
    Bonjour Andy7755,

    As your question deals with a specific English usage, I'm moving your thread to the English only forum.
    Hence a better chance for you to get comprehensive replies. :)
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    andy7755 said:
    Hi Everybody!
    In English, which of the following is correct?
    the shop is ran by nice people:cross:

    or
    the shop is run by nice people:tick:

    I think the first one is grammatically correct but as, when speaking, we use both, I'm not sure which one to write. Any help??
    I wouldn't use "run" in this sense - but that's just me:( - a lot of people do.
     

    Gordonedi

    Senior Member
    UK (Scotland) English
    panjandrum's response also gets my vote.

    The first sentence is grammatically incorrect : "ran" cannot follow "is".

    You could say "Nice people ran the shop" but that's in the past tense.

    :)
     

    VenusEnvy

    Senior Member
    English, United States
    I agree with the others.

    He ran the store until it closed down.
    Now, his father runs it.
    Nonetheless, the store is run by nice people.

    Here, run is a past participle acting as an adjective. (Someone, correct me if I'm wrong here)
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    VenusEnvy said:
    Here, run is a past participle acting as an adjective. (Someone, correct me if I'm wrong here)
    Hmmm - I am not a verb form person so this is risky, but I think "is run" in this sentence is simply the present tense of an intransitive version of the verb to run. It is like "is managed", or "is painted":)
    Ducking and running for cover with a hard hat.

    AHA - Big chuckle - I see VenusEnvy couldn't quite manage to write about "shop" and had to change it to "store".:p
     

    VenusEnvy

    Senior Member
    English, United States
    panjandrum said:

    AHA - Big chuckle - I see VenusEnvy couldn't quite manage to write about "shop" and had to change it to "store".:p
    Wow, I didn't even realize that I did that..
    Yah, we don't have shops here, only stores. :D
     

    GenJen54

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Originally posted by VenusEnvy Yah, we don't have shops here, only stores.
    Typically, yes. But don't forget, we still have:

    barber shops
    butcher shops

    Okay, so that's all I can think of on only one cup of coffee.

    Although, while traveling, I have happened into the occasional town where I have come across "Ye Olde Shoppe," usually constructed in some poor facsimile of Elizabethan archietecture. I suppose it's an odd attempt to bring a sense of "American antiquity" to those of us in the twenty-first century. Odd, because "we" were never Elizabethan. :)
     

    te gato

    Senior Member
    Alberta--TGE (te gato English)
    Ahhh..Yes we still have shops here...as mentioned above...
    I just find it very hard to say that I am going shopping at the shop..that is run by very nice people...

    Now if you will excuse me I am going to finish my coffee, at the coffee shop, before I go shopping....later we will talk shop..

    tg
     

    Tisia

    Senior Member
    Iran, Persian, Kurdish, English, Finnish
    Run Ran Run
    Don't run!

    Run is both present and past participle. Ran is only used in past form. After verbs like to be or to have(auxiliary), always the past participle is used in this case run.

    Don't shout at me for being too grammatical.
     

    Kelly B

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Tizha said:
    Don't shout at me for being too grammatical.
    What, here? Not likely. It's great when someone can explain it properly, it's just a little embarrassing (but not a great surprise) when the native English speakers are left in the dust(outRUN) in that area....

    By the way, I sometimes use "shop" to mean "store", and I was raised not too far from VenusEnvy's location, so that is not exclusively British usage. But then I knit, too.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Tizha said:
    Run is both present and past participle. Ran is only used in past form. After verbs like to be or to have(auxiliary), always the past participle is used in this case run.
    Don't shout at me for being too grammatical.
    No, No, No.
    :thumbsup: A big, genuine thank you.
    I knew I needed my hard hat when I had a go at being grammatical.
    Like Kelly B, I am humbled - and indeed embarrassed - that non-English-speakers have such a profound understanding of my language. I use it by instinct, not by understanding.
     

    josama

    Senior Member
    Colombia, Spanish
    panjandrum said:
    Originally Posted by andy7755
    Hi Everybody!
    In English, which of the following is correct?
    the shop is ran by nice people:cross:

    or
    the shop is run by nice people:tick:

    I think the first one is grammatically correct but as, when speaking, we use both, I'm not sure which one to write. Any help??



    I wouldn't use "run" in this sense - but that's just me:( - a lot of people do.
    Sorry for the belated post. I just came across it.

    I just wanted to say that the name of this is the it-seems-not-so-popular-around-here passive voice, as opposed to the straightforward active voice.

    Basically, when a sentence is in active voice, the subject of the VERB is the same person DOING or PERFORMING the action:

    The man paints the wall.

    Here, the man is both the subject and the person doing the action.​


    In passive voice, the subject or the VERB is the object of the action, that is, it's the person or thing which receives the action or upon which the action is performed (<-this very last sentence is in passive voice, for example). So, the corresponding sentence to the previously stated is:

    The wall is painted by the man.

    In this one, the wall is functioning as the subject of the verb, but is the object of the action, which is performed by the man.​

    Thus, the basic sintaxis of a passive-form sentence is as follows:​


    [Thing/person receiving action (Direct object)] + [BE, conjugated] + [past participle of verb] + [by] + [thing/person doing action]


    Consequently, the active form of your phrase is:

    Nice people run* the shop
    (*run is in present)

    ...and the passive:

    The shop is run** by nice people
    (Please compare to the sintaxis I gave you. **Here, run is the past participle of 'to run')


    Bye!
     

    modgirl

    Senior Member
    USA English
    phibroptix said:
    hi! I believe when it comes to managing or operating a business, "RUN" is being used.
    Ran can be used as a simple past tense.


    Eg: She ran a floral shop for three years.
     
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