rationable {rationale/ rational}

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Shandol

Senior Member
Persian
Hi,
The rationable behind these efforts is that the use of natural fibers offers several benefits, including low cost, high specific properties, renewable nature, and biodegradability.
Recent Advances in the Processing of Wood-Plastic Composites
Today I came across the adjective "rationable". According to Lexico Dictionary:
rationable1 - adjective - rare
  • 1 Scottish Of a thing: in accordance with or conformable to reason; reasonable, just, fair.
  • 2 Of a sentient being: having the faculty of reasoning; capable of reasoning; open to reason; rational, sensible.
rationable2 - adjective
  • Able to be rationed; capable of being rationed.
I think the use of "rationable" in the aforementioned sentence is wrong. The correct word would have to be "rationale" or it could also be the noun form of "rationable"!
My question here is ,firstly, do you agree with me on the above? Secondly, we know that:
Rational (adjective) --> rationale (noun)
But what is the noun of "rationable"?
Thanks in advance.
 
  • Shandol

    Senior Member
    Persian
    Thanks @tunaafi ,
    butt I doubt if you'll ever need it.
    Doubt away, I am going to use it a lot, from this moment forth. ;)
    I've got another question for you,
    Based on the original sentence mentioned in the OP,
    1. The rationable behind these efforts is that ....
    2. The rationability behind these efforts is that ...
    Do they both work for you?

    EDIT: See #8
     
    Last edited:

    Shandol

    Senior Member
    Persian
    "Rationability" would not be used.
    I see, but the point I was trying to make was that, despite the fact that their usage might rather seem similar and parallel, there is a difference between the two in terms of meaning. Actually, I am beginning to think that they are not interchangeable! :) <rationale ><rationability >
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    The words do not mean the same thing
    from The Century Dictionary. rationabiity noun The possession of reason, as the distinctive attribute of man.
    It is used in texts on philosophy and religion (~= the ability to reason, be "rational")
    The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language rationale noun The fundamental reasons for something; the basis.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Rationability — marked rare by dictionaries, of which there is not a single example in either of the main corpora, and which at least 99.9% of English speakers will never, ever use — apparently means the faculty of reason. Rationale means the reasoning/logic behind a certain contention.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Rationability — marked rare by dictionaries, of which there is not a single example in either of the main corpora, and which at least 99.9% of English speakers will never, ever use — apparently means the faculty of reason.
    I would have guessed it means the ability of something to be rationed (as in "Sugar was rationed during the war.") ;)
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    The rationable behind these efforts is that the use of natural fibers
    But what is the noun of "rationable"?
    The original word was "ratio"
    OED:
    2.†a. A reason, a rationale; an underlying or fundamental reason. Usually with of.
    1. Obsolete.
    1680 R. L'Estrange Citt & Bumpkin 38 You must not take it that all Governments are alike; but the Ratio of all Governments is the same in some Cases.

    The word is only now used in law as a short form of ratio decidendi OED: n. The rule of law or legal principle underlying and determining a judicial decision.
     

    Shandol

    Senior Member
    Persian
    Thank you all for the time you spent so as to illuminate the matter. :thumbsup:
    ====================================================
    You're working off the false premise that "rationale" is derived from "rational". They are separate words borrowed into English at different times from different sources.
    rational | Search Online Etymology Dictionary
    rationale | Search Online Etymology Dictionary
    How did you come to that conclusion? Nowhere did I suggest that!
    Rational (adjective) --> rationale (noun)
    But what is the noun of "rationable"?
    If you have taken the arrow as the process of derivation, you simply got me wrong. :) however, thanks for the etymology. ;)
    ==============================================================
    [...] and which at least 99.9% of English speakers will never, ever use
    Sometimes you've got to be a little more optimistic, LB. Where are your rose-colored glasses? ;)
    =====================================================================
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    How did you come to that conclusion? Nowhere did I suggest that!
    Among other things, you've started with a text that has "rationable" as a typo for "rationale" and you're trying to force all these other words to be related.

    Rational (adjective) --> rationale (noun)
    But what is the noun of "rationable"?
    You are saying here that there is a relationship between rational and rational and asking what word has the same relationship to "rationable." I'm telling you the first two words are unrelated, therefore the question has no meaning. "Raven" : "Writing desk" :: "rationable : ?
     

    Shandol

    Senior Member
    Persian
    You are saying here that there is a relationship between rational and rational and asking what word has the same relationship to "rationable." I'm telling you the first two words are unrelated
    Of course they are related. <rational><rationale> Actually, the relationship between the two is indisputable!
    According to Lexico:
    rational
    Origin

    Late Middle English (in the sense ‘having the ability to reason’): from Latin rationalis, from ratio(n-) ‘reckoning, reason’ (see ratio).
    rationale
    Origin

    Mid 17th century modern Latin, neuter (used as a noun) of Latin rationalis ‘endowed with reason’ (see rational).
     
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