raw / crude sense of humour

hyperslow

Senior Member
Polish
Hello there!
I've found different contexts in which raw and crude were used to describe a sense of humour. We usually speak of crude jokes or language which comes down to the vulgarity of its content. Crude and humour would be the words I naturally marry up. How about a raw sense of humour? Do they collocate? Perhaps there is a different meaning to it, raw = simple, unrefined but with no sexual undercurrent.
Am I splitting hairs?
cheers
 
  • Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    Do you have an example?

    Perhaps it is cruel and biting rather than crude. Rawness tends to hurt. On the other hand, it could mean raw as opposed to cooked, in which case it is unrefined.

    Your understanding of crude sounds fine. There isn't necessarily any sexual undercurrent in crude humour, which might merely consist of making jokes about farting.
     

    The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    "Raw" is often used to mean undeveloped or unpolished, as in "raw talent," but I don't see any usefulness in referring to a "raw sense of humor."
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    Uncle Jack, I infer that you wouldn't use a raw sense of humour at all.
    That's right. However, writers often feel the need to be more creative in their choice of words than I am, and I would not be particularly surprised to read "raw". However, I would expect some indication in the text as to what was meant, perhaps with an example.
     

    hyperslow

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Thank you Uncle Jack and The Newt
    You know, this is Use of English kind of exercise. They give you a short sentence and four words to choose from. The funny thing is that ngram shows a raw sense of humour and a crude sense of humour (obviously crude more frequently used, nonetheless, raw is there)

    Thanks
     
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