reach/gain God's salvation

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PeachYoghurt

Senior Member
Mandarin
Hi all! Do the following 2 sentences mean the same thing?
a) As Martin Luther taught, the Christian, in order to reach God's salvation, must make a leap of faith.
b)As Martin Luther taught, the Christian, in order to gain God's salvation, must make a leap of faith.
 
  • natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    PY, they do not mean exactly the same thing to me. Are these your own sentences?

    Both involve some kind of metaphor. The first suggests that God's salvation is like some kind of location and that the Christian has to move towards that location. The second suggests that God's salvation is perhaps a kind of gift or prize and the Christian has to get hold of it. What is common in both is the idea that the Christian has to do something in order to achieve God's salvation. (I know I've used another verb there. Another verb that is used is attain.)

    (Some might object to the formulation on theological grounds, because Luther emphasised that salvation is to do with God's grace and not with human endeavour.)
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    According to N-Gram, 'reach' and 'gain' aren't used, but there were results for 'earn'.
    I too thought of 'attain'. I haven't checked either 'attain' or 'achieve'.

    (
    because Luther emphasised that salvation is to do with God's grace and not with human endeavour.
    That was my impression too, just from studying the Reformation.)
     
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