Reaching even a few metres short of the peak of the Mulhacén"

lzarzalejo73

Senior Member
Spanish
I'm writing a small guidebook about Sierra Nevada, Spain, and I think the following sentence is not correct, it sounds odd to me: "It doesn’t matter what access route you choose to reach the summits; there are lagoons along all the routes, near the paths, particularly the one running along the all road which once left from Pradollano going up to Capileira, across the summits, reaching even a few metres short of the peak of Mulhacén". Thanks in advance for your kind cooperation.
 
  • Glenfarclas

    Senior Member
    English (American)
    Unfortunately I find the whole sentence to be meandering and confusing. What is the subject of "reaching" supposed to be? "The all road"? What's that?
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Yes, you start out well and then you have a grand champion run-on sentence (confusingly long and meandering).

    there are lagoons along all the routes, near the paths, particularly the one running along the all road which once left from Pradollano going up to Capileira, across the summits, reaching even a few metres short of the peak of Mulhacén"

    What is the main point of the sentence?

    Reaching is probably not the best word to use in the bold phrase.
     

    lzarzalejo73

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    I don't blame you; I admit it is long and meandering, apart from the typo "all road" which should read "old road". I try to explain myself. High up near the summits, there are seventy lagoons. This area can be reached trekking along many different routes. The lagoons are on both sides of the many existing paths, particularly along the path which runs “on top of” the ancient/old/former road which once left from Pradollano and went up to Capileira. This trajectory runs along near the peak of the Mulhacén. I hope this time it makes more sense. Thanks for your assistance.
     

    DavidSco

    New Member
    English - Scotland
    I would write "which reaches to just a few metres short of". In fact, I think I would prefer "passes just a few metres below".

    "Short of" implies to me that the road stops, but I am inferring that the road carries on: it is a road passing the peak leading to a destination, rather than a road to (or nearly to) the peak itself.

    The WR dictionary has small ponds, especially those which may drain out, as an alternative definition for lagoons. I think that these are the sort of bodies of water referred to here.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    As I see it:
    "It doesn’t matter what access route you choose to reach the summits; there are lagoons near the paths along all the routes - particularly the paths that follow the old road which once ran over the summits from Pradollano up to Capileira and even came within a few metres of the peak of Mulhacén".
     

    lzarzalejo73

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Thank you very much to all of you. I very much liked your sentence, PaulQ; an excellent rephrasing, I think Cheers.
     
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