Read!

< Previous | Next >

Binapesi

Member
Türkçe
Hello,

Could you say "read!" the imperative form of it in your own languages, please? I am going to make a "read cloud" with photoshop using them, which is to be pressed on a bag.

Thank you.
kt.
 
  • ilocas2

    Banned
    Czech
    Czech:

    čti - imperative for 2nd person singular
    čtěte - imperative for 2nd person plural or 2nd person singular (T-V distinction)
    čtěme - imperative for 1st person plural
     
    Last edited:

    Rallino

    Moderatoúrkos
    Turkish
    Turkish:

    oku - imperative for 2nd person singular
    okuyun - imperative for 2nd person plural or 2nd person cordial form (T-V distinction)
     

    arielipi

    Senior Member
    Hebrew
    Hebrew:
    proper use is second person (singular/plural male/female) only and the imperative form is its own time tense, but commonly people use the future tense (except for some verbs)

    proper use:
    קרא kra male singular
    קראי kir'i female singular
    קראו kir'u plural (when there are two males and more its always male form) male (+ female); 1 male 1 female is this form.
    קראנה krana plural female (if theres one male and 2+ females its this form)

    common use:
    תקרא tikra male singular
    תקראי tikre'i female singular
    תקראו tikre'u plural male/female
     

    Словеса

    Senior Member
    Русский
    Russian: Читай!
    The second person singular works well for a bag. The exclamation mark is better to be written.
     
    Last edited:

    ahmedcowon

    Senior Member
    Hebrew:
    proper use is second person (singular/plural male/female) only and the imperative form is its own time tense, but commonly people use the future tense (except for some verbs)

    proper use:
    קרא kra male singular
    קראי kir'i female singular
    קראו kir'u plural (when there are two males and more its always male form) male (+ female); 1 male 1 female is this form.
    קראנה krana plural female (if theres one male and 2+ females its this form)
    Arabic:

    اقرأ iqra' (male singular)
    اقرأي iqra'i (female singular)
    اقرئا iqra'a (dual)
    اقرأوا iqra'u (male plural)
    اقرأن iqra'na (female plural)
     
    «Διάβασε!» ['͡ðʝavase!] --> 2nd p. sing. present imperative
    «Διαβάσ(ε)τε!» [͡ðʝa'vas(e)te!] --> 2nd p. pl. or 2nd p. formal present imperative


    The verb in the indicative (present tense) is «διαβάζω» [ði.a'vazo] or [͡ðʝa'vazo] --> to read < Byz. v. «διαβάζω» diabázō < Classical v. «διαβιβάζω» dĭăbĭbázō --> lit. to carry over or across, transport, lead over, metaph. to read < compound; prefix, adv. and preposition «διὰ» dià, in two, apart, through (PIE *dis-, apart) + Classical v. «βαίνω» baínō (casual, «βιβάζω» bĭbázō) --> to go (PIE *gʷem-/*gʷeh₂-, to step, go, come, approach cf Skt. गच्छति (gacchati), to go; Lat. venīre, to come, approach; Proto-Germanic *kwemaną, to come > Ger. kommen, Eng. come, Dt. komen, D./Nor. (Bokmål) komme, Nor. (Nynorsk) kome/koma, Swe. komma)
     

    DearPrudence

    Dépêche Mod (AL mod)
    IdF
    French (lower Normandy)
    In French:
    Lis ! (for one person, informal or to children) (tu)
    Lisez ! (for one person, formal or several people, formal or informal) (vous)
    So I suppose the latter would work better.
     

    Словеса

    Senior Member
    Русский
    So I suppose the latter would work better.
    That is actually interesting. In Russian, the singular&informal form is often used for slogans, appeals, etc (informal appeals, of course) – exactly because it is informal. The formal&plural form, instead, could be understood a bit like "read right now!", "read what's written here!", though the general meaning ("read books!") is also there. I.e., in Russian the singular form is, I suppose, better for exactly the same reason that you suppose in French the plural form is better. If, on the same bag, some inscriptions use the singular form and other inscriptions use the plural form, that would probably look a bit strange. So?..
     

    DearPrudence

    Dépêche Mod (AL mod)
    IdF
    French (lower Normandy)
    Yes, that's complicated :D
    In commercials, on TV, radio, we are talked to as 'vous', as we are potential consumers with money (even for gambling sites or games sites, aimed at teenagers and young adults). Shopkeepers also use 'vous'. So I was quite shocked in Spain when they used 'tú' with everyone :eek:
    Here, we are not buying anything but the informal 'tu' would seem, to me, more appropriate for a children's section in a library.
     

    Словеса

    Senior Member
    Русский
    As far as I know, we are even less likely than you to use the informal address, and certainly less likely than Spanish or Italians (who, as far as I know, use 'lei' in stores anyway). But commercials and especially social or political slogans tend to be agressive, so in Russia they would use rather the singular number form. Commercials are written with the formal address more often than not, but with slogans, it is the other way around.
    Yes, I understand your reaction. In libraries, book stores etc, it would of course be only the plural in Russian. Well, if the author of the thread wants to align for the formal variant, the Russian one is «Читайте!». I would say, it is somewhat more moralising, though I may have made this impression up.
     

    Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    In Portugal the singular informal address (tu) is mostly used in slogans addressed specifically to the younger demographics. On the other hand, the plural (vocês) sounds a bit too formal, or even awkward, in a generic one-word sentence. So I picked the formal singular (você), which seems to be the most common in advertising.
     

    Binapesi

    Member
    Türkçe
    Thank you so much so far!
    And I'm sorry because I should have emphasised that I only really need the 2nd person singular form.

    I still need many more languages and only 2 days left. Could you keep on writing please please please?
     

    Binapesi

    Member
    Türkçe
    So far:

    Czech: čti - imperative for 2nd person singular

    Turkish: oku - imperative for 2nd person singular

    Hebrew: (I couldn't really decide which one to use)

    קרא kra male singular

    Russian: Читай!

    Arabic:

    اقرأ iqra' (male singular)

    Swedish: Läs!

    Portuguese: Leia!

    Greek: Διάβασε!

    French: Lisez !

    Dutch: Lees !

    Slovak: čítaj

    Croatian/Bosnian/Serbian/Montenegrin: čitaj

    Spanish: lee

    Hungarian: olvass

    Latin: lege

    Sanskrit: पठ

    Urdu: پڑھو

    Persian:بخوان

    Hindi: पढ़ो

    Punjabi: ਪੜ੍ਹੋ

    Gujarati: વાંચો

    German: Lies

    I think that informal works better, but I'll use the one DearPrudence suggested for French.
     
    Last edited:

    bibax

    Senior Member
    Czech (Prague)
    Hungarian is interesting. All conjugated forms have two variants: indefinite and definite.

    olvass - 2nd person singular indefinite
    olvasd - 2nd person singular definite

    Examples:

    Olvass minden nap! = Read every day! (an appeal to the children)
    Olvass és álmoss! = Read and dream!

    Olvasd a Bibliát! = Read the Bible! (a = the definite article!)
    Olvasd újra! = Read it once more (again)!
     

    marrish

    Senior Member
    اُردو Urdu
    Sanskrit: पठ
    Urdu: پڑھو
    Persian: بخوان
    Hindi: पढ़ो
    Punjabi: ਪੜ੍ਹੋ
    Gujarati: વાંચો
     

    marrish

    Senior Member
    اُردو Urdu
    ^ I think the pronunciation of "i" and "y" is different.

    @YellowOnline: I keep enough layouts/input methods to be able to type in the languages I know :D but I have also got the Belgian one.
     

    Ali Smith

    Senior Member
    Urdu - Pakistan
    Hebrew:
    proper use is second person (singular/plural male/female) only and the imperative form is its own time tense, but commonly people use the future tense (except for some verbs)

    proper use:
    קרא kra male singular
    קראי kir'i female singular
    קראו kir'u plural (when there are two males and more its always male form) male (+ female); 1 male 1 female is this form.
    קראנה krana plural female (if theres one male and 2+ females its this form)

    common use:
    תקרא tikra male singular
    תקראי tikre'i female singular
    תקראו tikre'u plural male/female
    Is קראנה pronounced krana or krena?
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top