reason for/to

< Previous | Next >

audiolaik

Senior Member
Polish
Hello,

This is a stand-alone sentence:

I only came to see you

My sole reason for coming/to come was to see you.

Which is correct?

The key says it's for coming, however, I'm inclined to accept the other one, too.
 
  • audiolaik

    Senior Member
    Polish
    I would call it "intuition":).

    You may be right. It sounds odd now.

    What about My sole reason why I came was to see you?

    p.s. Why do you consider it incorrect?

    p.s.2 I've googled reason to come - only one hit
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I would call it "intuition":).

    You may be right. It sounds odd now.

    What about My sole reason why I came was to see you?

    p.s. Why do you consider it incorrect?

    p.s.2 I've googled reason to come - only one hit
    And if you googled my sole reason why I came to see you you'd get 7 hits, apart from your own post.

    We do say The sole reason why I came to see you or My sole reason for coming to see you.
     

    kenny4528

    Senior Member
    Mandarin, Taiwan
    Hi,

    Could it be regional usage difference? My dictionary at hand lists both patterns are acceptable:

    They must have had a good reason to do it.
    People give many different reasons for wanting to change the job.
    Or am I missing the point?
     

    Mjolnir

    Senior Member
    Israel, Hebrew, English
    They must have had a good reason to do it.
    People give many different reasons for wanting to change the job.


    Those two are acceptable, but these two are not:

    They must have had a good reason to doing it.
    People give many different reasons for want to change the job.
     

    wheaten

    Member
    USA english; Canadian English
    I agree with miyamoto,

    My sole reason for coming was to see you.

    is preferred.


    //My sole reason why I came was to see you//

    This would be correct if "my" were replaced by "the". As it is, it's kind of redundant, in my opinion.
     

    Eixerit

    Member
    Catalonia, Catalan.
    I'll try an explantaion: "for coming" is a complement of "reason" but "to come" means the purpose is to come.
    Another example: "I'll take the gun to kill bears" means I'll do it (take the gun) with the purpose of killing bears. But if I say "I'll take the gun for killing bears" means I'll take the gun which is good to kill bears. What do you think?
    On the first case, bears are in danger for sure, but not on the second case
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Hi,

    Could it be regional usage difference? My dictionary at hand lists both patterns are acceptable:



    Or am I missing the point?
    I think so, Kenny.

    The patterns your dictionary says are acceptable:

    They must have had a good reason to do it.
    People give many different reasons for wanting to change the job.

    are acceptable, but they are not the pattern I said was unacceptable:

    my sole reason to come to see you.

    I doubt if your book says you can say my reason to do it.

    We say:

    my sole reason for coming to see you.
    my reason for doing it.

    To come to see you doesn't have to be a final construction, Eixerit. I can say I like to come to see you, or To come to see you gives me pleasure, but I think you are right to suggest that placed after reason as has been suggested it would have a final sense (to would mean in order to) and this is why my reason to do it doesn't work grammatically.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top