Recede?

alex_ln

Senior Member
Polish
Hello
Is recede the trauma in my context correctly used?
"My grandma passed away around 7 years ago when I was an adolescent; I was dependent on her; as a result of this dependency it took some time for me to recede the trauma when she passed away!"

Thanks
 
  • lucas-sp

    Senior Member
    English - Californian
    I believe that, if you check the dictionary, you will find that "recede" is not a transitive verb. Therefore "I" can't "recede anything" - the trauma can either "recede" on its own, or you can "contain," "struggle through," or "minimize" the trauma.
     

    alex_ln

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Sorry I mix-up "transitive" and "intransitive" :D
    So is " it took some time for me to recede the trauma when she passed away!" correct?
     

    lucas-sp

    Senior Member
    English - Californian
    No. Because "recede" is intransitive; it can't take an object. So "I receded the trauma" is nonsensical.
     

    alex_ln

    Senior Member
    Polish
    " it took some time for me to recede the trauma when she passed away!" But I do not think if the subject of my sentence is "I"; Although it takes some time time for me(me is an object), the subject is "It". Doesn't imply this one? If no, what would you say; would you say "it took some time for me that it receded the trauma when she passed away!"?
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    No. Since "recede" is not a transitive verb, it cannot take an object. That means that you cannot recede something. You cannot recede the trauma. You cannot recede anything at all; it does not make sense. Something can recede, like the tide, but you cannot recede it.

    So, any sentence that includes the words "recede the trauma," with any form of the verb "to recede," is wrong. You must either use a different verb or change the sentence around: "the trauma receded."
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    You would have to say:
    "... it took some time for my trauma to recede..."
    I don't think it's the best pairing. Trauma is like an injury - it heals. A cloud of depression might recede.
     

    lucas-sp

    Senior Member
    English - Californian
    The subject of your infinitive phrase "for me to recede the trauma" is "I" ("I" appears as "me" because it's the object of the preposition "for" in "it took some time for..."); the object is "the trauma"; the verb is "to recede." Rewriting it as a sentence makes "I receded the trauma."

    Compare this expansion of the phrase to "It took some time for the students to finish the test." It's clear that what "took time" is "the finishing of the test by the students." Thus: "The students finished the test - it took them some time to do so."
     

    alex_ln

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Thank you :)
    So my sentence needs to be changed to "It took some time that the trauma receded!" Right?I hope so:)
     

    lucas-sp

    Senior Member
    English - Californian
    No... now you've abandoned what was otherwise a good structure. "It took some time for the trauma to recede" is what you'd want; you can add "me" back in, as Myridon suggests, by saying "...for my trauma to recede."

    We still have to deal with the question of whether or not traumas recede. I think that's ok; Myridon does not.
     

    alex_ln

    Senior Member
    Polish
    No... now you've abandoned what was otherwise a good structure. "It took some time for the trauma to recede" is what you'd want; you can add "me" back in, as Myridon suggests, by saying "...for my trauma to recede."

    We still have to deal with the question of whether or not traumas recede. I think that's ok; Myridon does not.
    Oh I see; I had not seen that post! Good! Thank you :)
     
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