recommendation (with?)

< Previous | Next >

Alaor Santos

Senior Member
Portuguese Brazil
Please, in the following sentence, is "with" all right? My Oxford suggests "on, for or about". Does "with" change the meaning?

"Make your recommendations with the campaign's success at the forefront..."

Thank you
 
  • Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Alaor Santos, can you give the whole sentence please?

    I expect it's something like:
    Make your recommendations with the campaign's success at the forefront of your mind.

    Which is perfectly fine, being equivalent to:
    Make your recommendations [on the proposals/ideas etc] with the campaign's success at the forefront of your mind.

    EDIT: Actually, I suppose the sentence could end at "forefront", with "of your mind" being understood...
     

    gasman

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    To get rid of the ambiguity you could alter

    Make your recommendations with the campaign's success at the forefront of your mind.
    by putting a comma after recommendations.
     

    Alaor Santos

    Senior Member
    Portuguese Brazil
    Hi, I have looked up the dictionary, but I still need help with this sentence. It might sound easy - and certainly is -, but I find problems figuring it out with my portuguese-thinking mind.

    Make your recommendations with the campaign's success at the forefront--not just your bottom line.

     

    nzfauna

    Senior Member
    New Zealand, English
    I believe it's short for "...at the forefront of your mind".

    "The bottom line" = the minimum you will accept.

    So the sentence means: The author is telling [John] to write some recommendations that will lead to the campaign doing really well, not just OK.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    [...]
    Make your recommendations with the campaign's success at the forefront--not just your bottom line.
    Sans context, let's try a possible scenario.

    I am leading a consultancy team commissioned to prepare and implement an advertising campaign.
    There are many possible approaches we might take.
    Some will cost the client a great deal of money - and indeed will create a great deal of income for us.
    Some will have a higher probability of a positive outcome for the client.

    As we review the options in our report to the client, leading to our recommendations as to how the client should proceed, there are two possibly conflicting objectives for us.
    Should we maximise our profit, or maximise the chance of success for the client.

    This sentence suggests that we adopt the latter approach.
    We make our recommendations in the best interests of the campaign, setting aside (or at least not focusing entirely on) our own particular financial interests (our bottom line).
     

    olliemae

    Senior Member
    New Zealand/America, English
    I believe it's short for "...at the forefront of your mind".

    "The bottom line" = the minimum you will accept.

    So the sentence means: The author is telling [John] to write some recommendations that will lead to the campaign doing really well, not just OK.
    In America "the bottom line" always means profit.
    That gives the sentence the meaning that he should make recommendations that will benefit the campaign, not just his personal finances.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top