Reconcile (active-passive)

emanko

Senior Member
Arabic- Egyptian
Hello

In Longman dictionary, the verb "reconcile" is used in the passive voice (to be reconciled with someone).
Eg:
Jonah and his youngest son were, on the surface at least, reconciled. (were reconciled)

1- Does this necessarily mean that a third party interfered and tried to help them work out their problems?
Or it's just an expression and there doesn't have to be a third party?

2- What if I know for sure that there was a third party and I want to mention their role in the reconciliation? How should I express that?

Should I say: Mary reconciled Jude with Mira? And with using pronouns (Mary reconciled them with each other).

Thank you
 
  • se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Mary reconciled Jude with Mira. :tick:
    Mary reconciled them with each other. :tick:
    Jonah and his youngest son were, on the surface at least, reconciled. :tick:

    In the last sentence we don't know who or what reconciled them. Is it possible to be reconciled with someone without any reason or cause at all?
     

    emanko

    Senior Member
    Arabic- Egyptian
    Thank you.
    I didn't say that it's possible to be reconciled with someone without a reason.
    I said: Does this necessarily mean that a third party interfered and tried to help them work out their problems?

    Do we use the passive voice only when there's a third party? In other words, if Jude decides she is going to talk to Mira and sort things out with her, do we still use the passive voice (Jude and Mira were reconciled)?
     

    Rival

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    If no agency is mentioned or implied, it's quite possible that "reconciled" is not a passive form at all.
    It can easily be a Past Participle -- "I am reconciled to my fate."
    .
     

    emanko

    Senior Member
    Arabic- Egyptian
    If no agency is mentioned or implied, it's quite possible that "reconciled" is not a passive form at all.
    It can easily be a Past Participle -- "I am reconciled to my fate."
    .
    Thank you.
    But that's a different sense of the word. It implies acceptance of a difficult situation.
    The sense I'm interested in here is "making up with somebody".
    Can I say:
    Jude reconciled with Mira. ?
    Or should I use the passive form even if no one else interfered ?
    Jude and Mira were reconciled.
     

    Rival

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    But that's a different sense of the word.
    So you think "making up with somebody" doesn't require "acceptance of a difficult situation"?
    I'm so glad you're here to teach me English.
     
    Last edited:

    emanko

    Senior Member
    Arabic- Egyptian
    < Response to now-deleted comment removed. Cagey, moderator >

    The two senses are listed as separate entries in Longman dictionary. And it goes without saying that senses of the same word are often related, but not necessarily similar.
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    If no agency is mentioned or implied, it's quite possible that "reconciled" is not a passive form at all.
    It can easily be a Past Participle -- "I am reconciled to my fate."
    Or "reconciled" could be an adjective.
    Jude reconciled with Mira.
    I wouldn't write this myself, but I wouldn't be entirely surprised to see it. Some people switch object to subject in this kind of case more freely than others.
     
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