Reduced Adverbial Clause with the verb to be

Discussion in 'English Only' started by EnglishABC, Jun 24, 2010.

  1. EnglishABC Senior Member

    NZ English
    We can omit the subject and verb to be in adverbial clauses.
    Can we reduce it if the verb to be is in a different aspect:

    a. Although he had been proven wrong twice already, he believed we had little chance of winning.
    b. Although proven wrong twice already, he believed we had little chance of winning.


    c. Although he has been proven wrong twice already, he believes we have little chance of winning.
    d. Although proven wrong twice already, he believes we have little chance of winning


    Is there anything else you can tell me about the omission/reduction of clauses concerning to be?

    Thank you
     
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2010
  2. suzi br

    suzi br Senior Member

    Cheshire
    English / England
    I'm not sure the tense sequence in the first one works anyway! Shouldn't it be:

    Although he had been proved wrong etc . ?
     
  3. EnglishABC Senior Member

    NZ English
    Maybe it should be 'had been proven...'

    It may be correct as is also though. Wait to hear from others I guess...
     
  4. suzi br

    suzi br Senior Member

    Cheshire
    English / England
    I am certain that the tense issue is muddled.

    Why do you think it should be proven rather than proved?

    It is confusing that you've posted several threads on the same phrase, too!
     
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2010
  5. EnglishABC Senior Member

    NZ English
    Right, sorry...the past perfect is needed to show it happens before the to believe...

    proven or proved works...Sorry, I was unaware either works as PP form.
     
  6. EnglishABC Senior Member

    NZ English
    I have edited the original as per what you mentioned. I hope no one began answering
     

Share This Page

Loading...