Reduced relative clauses/defining relative clauses

Discussion in 'English Only' started by Jigen, Aug 5, 2015.

  1. Jigen

    Jigen Senior Member

    Amalfi
    Italian
    Some days ago I posted a thread concerning the following sentence
    "Joseph is the kind of person who gets everything he wants":tick:
    I asked if it was possible to reduce it by using and -ing reduced relative clause(being it a defining ralative clause)

    Joseph is the kind of person getting everything he wants:cross:

    I was answered that it was not correct to reformulate the sentence with an ing form,

    My question now is,is it correct to conclude that ,even though reduced ing clauses often correspond to a def. relative clause,we can't reformulate every def relative clause with an -ing reduced relative clause?
     
  2. PaulQ

    PaulQ Senior Member

    UK
    English - England
    Please note:

    Joseph, getting everything he wants, told his parents he needed an iPhone6. = Joseph, who gets everything he wants, told his parents he needed an iPhone6.

    In "Joseph, getting everything he wants", we have one subject.

    In Joseph is the kind of person getting everything he wants we have a subject, Joseph; a complement "the kind of person" but then we have "getting everything he wants": it should be "getting everything they want" and "he wants" should be they want.

    Because the example is filled with errors, there is no point in trying to use it as an example.
     
  3. Jigen

    Jigen Senior Member

    Amalfi
    Italian
    If I rewrite the previous sentente as

    "Joseph is the kind of person getting everything they want." Can it be considered correct ?
     
  4. PaulQ

    PaulQ Senior Member

    UK
    English - England
    Yes, it can, although (i) "Joseph is the kind of person who gets everything they want." is the normal construction (ii) "Joseph is the kind of person getting everything they want." is not a usual construction and the context would have to be OK:

    TV Interviewer: "Today's report is about young people whose parents cannot say "No" to them, and who get everything they want. The first guest is Joseph. His parents are wealthy and Joseph is the kind of person getting everything they want."

    The difficulty is the continuous form of the verb which does not usually fit with irregular activity (getting everything they want.) The TV Interviewer uses it to give the impression that Joseph receives something once or twice a day.
     
  5. se16teddy

    se16teddy Senior Member

    London but from Yorkshire
    English - England
    I can't imagine anyone I know ever saying or writing this. I suppose this is the same as "incorrect".
     
  6. Forero Senior Member

    Houston, Texas, USA
    USA English
    I agree with PaulQ that he wants in the original sentence is confusing: they want is better.

    And I agree with PaulQ that the sentence asked about in #3 is grammatical but unusual, but I disagree that the present participle is a continuous form. The present participle has no tense, no mood, and no aspect.

    I agree with Se16teddy that it is hard to imagine someone saying it, including in the sample context PaulQ has provided. In that context, he wants seems to fit better.

    Another problem I have with the altered sentence is that in identifying the group of people "who get everything they want" as "getting everything they want", it comes across as too literal. The original sentence is an exaggeration. People who "get everything they want" do not in fact get everything they want.
     
  7. Loob

    Loob Senior Member

    English UK
    That looks like a good conclusion to me:).
     

Share This Page

Loading...