refining the spectral colors

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adel0806

Member
korean
White light can be produced by refining the spectral colors.

Above sentence, what does 'refine' mean?

Thanks for any comments
 
  • PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    "Refine" seems to be the wrong verb - where did you find this example, and what is the context?
     

    adel0806

    Member
    korean
    "Refine" seems to be the wrong verb - where did you find this example, and what is the context?[/Q
    Originally, white light can be produced by combining the spectral colors.
    I think 'refine' means 'make a bit change'
    I am wondering if I can use refine instead of combine.
     

    Orble

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    No. It is the wrong verb as PaulQ said.

    Refinement is like purification. It generally implies, in this technical/scientific context, that something is being broken down into components. A purer, less adulterated, result is obtained.

    But what you are referring to is a very different process whereby light of different colours are combined, in the same proportions as they exist in sunlight, so they appear as white light. No refinement is involved. It’s building up from component parts, not breaking down into component parts.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    Originally, white light can be produced by combining the spectral colors.
    I think 'refine' means 'make a bit change'
    "Combine" is correct. "Refine" cannot mean "combine". "Refine" has one thing as its object.

    We use "refine" when we talk about turning a rough product (raw metal ore from a mine) into a clean product (metal). "Refine" means "remove impurities" (remove everthing else: dirt, other metals, rocks).
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    The spectral colors are a continuum. I think you can "define" the colors by their wave lengths.



     
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