Reflecting UCR's diversity, a number of residence halls have

SRPGgamer

Senior Member
Chinese
Hello everyone.

Help me take a look at the following sentences:

" Reflecting UCR's diversity, a number of residence halls have been established for specific social, cultural and academic needs."

I am having doubt with the sentence beginning with ing-form. For example, I personally take "
" Reflecting UCR's diversity, a number of........(blah, blah ,blah)" as "For reflecting UCR's diversity, a number of.......". Because in this case, it means "A number of residence halls have been established for specific social, cultural and academic needs and THEREFORE, it reflects UCR's diversity". Am I correct to say that?
 
  • Pidginboy

    Senior Member
    India-Local dialect
    The original sentence as well as your rephrasing is correct.The first one(original one) is rather idiomatic, although your version is not grammatically wrong.
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    The residence halls weren't established in order to reflect (show) the diversity: that is, they weren't established for showing the diversity. They do show the diversity, and your "therefore" meaning is correct, but the intermediate step with "for" is not quite the right meaning.

    What reflects the diversity? In grammatical terms, what is the word 'reflecting' being predicated of (if anything)? It's not the halls: the halls aren't reflecting the diversity. Rather it's the fact that the halls were established. It's the whole situation and resulting state in the main clause that is what 'reflecting' is about.
     

    Franco-filly

    Senior Member
    English - Southern England
    The original is correct but Reflecting could be replaced by To reflect or In order to reflect.

    Your meaning is correct, however you cannot use the word For in this context.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Having read your suggested sentence, I find it not only unnatural, but "it" has no identifiable antecedent.

    There is nothing wrong with beginning a sentence with a progressive form of a verb, but there's a danger of misconnection with the rest of the sentence as in "After saying goodbye to my mother, the train left."

    The original sentence you quoted is fine.
     
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