refused failed disagreed argued

< Previous | Next >

ilikeenglish

Senior Member
South Africa
Most of the members agreed to the plan but a few about it.
A. refused B. failed C. disagreed D. argued

Which one will you choose as a best choice? I found two can do according to the dictionary, but don't know how your natives think about this?
Is it a poorly designed question?
 
  • Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Most of the members agreed to the plan but a few about it.
    A. refused B. failed C. disagreed D. argued

    Which one will you choose as a best choice? I found two can do according to the dictionary, but don't know how your natives think about this?
    Is it a poorly designed question?
    If this is the question verbatim, it's very poorly designed. If the question were: "Most of the members agreed to the plan but a few ------------", I would say the answer is C. ie.

    "Most of the members agreed to the plan but a few disagreed." It could also be D:

    "Most of the members agreed to the plan but a few argued about it".
     

    ilikeenglish

    Senior Member
    South Africa
    the question is :
    Most of the members agreed to the plan but a few ........ about it.

    But according to Oxford dictonary, there is such a verb phrase: disagree (with sb/sth) (about/on sth). But the funny thing is that it only gives the example using the prepostion of only "on" but not "about".

    So I think maybe the third answer is also OK? Maybe "disagree about" is seldomly used?
     

    Sporky

    New Member
    English, Australia
    Most of the members agreed to the plan but a few ------ about it.
    A. refused B. failed C. disagreed D. argued

    Which one will you choose as a best choice? I found two can do according to the dictionary, but don't know how your natives think about this?
    Is it a poorly designed question?
    In this case, D can be used most effectively.
    Most of the members agreed to the plan but a few argued about it.

    Or you could reword the question to say:
    Most of the members agreed to the plan, but a few disagreed on it.
    However, there is a small amount of repetition (agreed/disagreed) making this phrase somewhat less desirable.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    the question is :
    Most of the members agreed to the plan but a few ........ about it.

    But according to Oxford dictonary, there is such a verb phrase: disagree (with sb/sth) (about/on sth). But the funny thing is that it only gives the example using the prepostion of only "on" but not "about".

    So I think maybe the third answer is also OK? Maybe "disagree about" is seldomly used?
    Disagree about is used often, in fact it is common in these forums when people agree to disagree about some point of grammar or usage. It just doesn't "work" in the test sentence. I wonder why.

    I think it's because the first part of the sentence says most of the members agreed. If you had to use disagreed, this sentence would be better:
    Most of the members agreed to the plan but a few disagreed.
     

    ilikeenglish

    Senior Member
    South Africa
    Thank you for your creative answers. I think this forum is really great, helping people solve problems. I couldn't love it more. (By the way, each time I use this structure, my first response is always to say "I couldn't love it less" with the same meaning that "I couldn't love it enough". I just don't understand why people use such a misleading structure.)
    On the whole, I like English and I appreciate your warm participation and generous help.
     

    Martin Harrison

    New Member
    English England
    Another way of ending the sentence might be "Most of the members agreed to the plan but a few did not." This has the advantage of leaving their reasons for not agreeing open.
     

    maxiogee

    Banned
    English
    Most of the members agreed to the plan but a few ______ about it.
    A. refused B. failed C. disagreed D. argued

    Argued would fit, but I don't see the need for the "but". Usually an argument has two sides, those who "disagree with" X argue about it with those who "agree with".

    Faced with a plan, people might usually be reported to have disagreed with it (the plan), or disagreed (with others) about aspects of it.

    I think it is a poorly draughted question.
     

    ilikeenglish

    Senior Member
    South Africa
    Thank you all. Maxiogee's opinion is similar to mine inital one, though mine has now changed a little during this discussion.

    I still think this is problematic question, because it is out of a test bank not designed for high-level language learners. So, I think the constructor doesn't attempt to make it such a complicated one. Then at which link was this item wrongly produced? In the typing or editing stage? No one knows, but sometimes we just don't have anyone to turn to discuss. I once wrote via e-mail to a press, but no one responded, so I really don't want to write to them any more.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top