regain visual contact

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kansi

Senior Member
japanese
The US Navy has released incident reports from pilots describing their encounters with UFOs, including one detailing a silver object 'the size of a suitcase'
In one March 26, 2014 report, a pilot described seeing a "metallic object," which was "small in size, approximately the size of a suitcase, and silver in color."

The pilot came within 1,000 feet of the object, but "was unable to positively determine the identity of the aircraft. The pilot subsequently "attempted to regain visual contact with the aircraft, but was unable."

What does regain visual contact mean?
 
  • Barque

    Banned
    Tamil
    He lost visual contact, and tried to get it back.

    Visual contact = contact by vision, or in simpler words, being able to see something. He saw it, went close to it, lost sight of it (maybe because it went behind a cloud or in some other direction) and then tried to spot it again.

    Similarly, audio contact in that context would mean being able to stay in touch with someone over the radio.

    regain -- re-gain -- to gain again.
     
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    kansi

    Senior Member
    japanese
    contact by vision, or in simpler words, being able to see something. He saw it, went close to it, lost sight of it (maybe because it went behind a cloud or in some other direction) and then tried to spot it again.
    I have understand the meaning. Is "I regained visual contact" a more difficult way to say "I was able to see again."?
     

    Barque

    Banned
    Tamil
    No.

    I was able to see again - This means "I went blind and then got back my sight" or "I couldn't see anything for some time and then was able to start seeing things again". The lack of an object for "see" here makes it general.

    I regained visual contact - I was able to see it/him for some time, then I lost sight of it/him, and then I saw it/him again.

    "Regain visual contact" is used only in some contexts, such as while flying planes. You wouldn't usually use it in more commonplace contexts.
     

    kansi

    Senior Member
    japanese
    I was able to see again - This means "I went blind and then got back my sight" or "I couldn't see anything for some time and then was able to start seeing things again". The lack of an object for "see" here makes it general.

    I regained visual contact - I was able to see it/him for some time, then I lost sight of it/him, and then I saw it/him again.
    You meant I was able to see him again can mean the bold, so that's the difference between I was able to see him again and I regain visual contact?
     

    Barque

    Banned
    Tamil
    You have to read every word carefully. Leaving out even a single word can change the meaning.

    Post #3: You asked about:
    "I was able to see again."
    In post 4 I told you what "I was able to see again" means.

    This is not the same as:
    I was able to see him again
    This is because the use of "him" changes the meaning.


    so that's the difference between I was able to see him again and I regain visual contact?
    No. The difference is what I said in #4, which was:
    "Regain visual contact" is used only in some contexts, such as while flying planes. You wouldn't usually use it in more commonplace contexts.

    In this context, "I was able to regain visual contact" would mean the same as "I was able to see him again".
     

    Barque

    Banned
    Tamil
    In #4, I was talking of the difference between "I was able to see again" and "I regained visual contact", because you asked about "I did not see again".

    I was not talking of the difference between "I was able to see him again" and "I regained visual contact". These could mean the same thing in your context.

    I realise that by "I was able to see again", you meant "I was able to see him again", but they don't mean the same thing.
     

    kansi

    Senior Member
    japanese
    In #4, I was talking of the difference between "I was able to see again" and "I regained visual contact", because you asked about "I did not see again".

    I was not talking of the difference between "I was able to see him again" and "I regained visual contact". These could mean the same thing in your context.

    I realise that by "I was able to see again", you meant "I was able to see him again", but they don't mean the same thing.
    I see.What about this context?
    the context: I was following him where it's very clouded with people and I lost him for some time then somehow I was able to see him again. I was happy about it.
    The person following him:I am glad that I regained visual contact with him.

    This sounds weird,right? It's like the use of the phrase in a casual context is too much?
     

    kansi

    Senior Member
    japanese
    Yes, I wouldn't use "visual contact" there. I'm glad I was able to find him again.
    Is it because it's usually used in writing? Or is it because it's usually used in the context of flying planes?

    What about the context of driving a car, sailng a ship or driving a train?
     

    Barque

    Banned
    Tamil
    It's used in military contexts and while flying planes, both in speech and writing.

    It's not used in regular everyday contexts.
     
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    kansi

    Senior Member
    japanese
    It's used in military contexts and while flying planes, , both in speech and writing.
    It’s only in military contexts and while flying planes.

    It seems like the marine coast guard ships would also use the term while patrolling. Do you think so?
     

    kansi

    Senior Member
    japanese
    I didn't say "only". Those are the ones I could think of offhand. There could be others.


    Possibly.

    It isn't a term that most people would need to use.
    I see..
    There would be other contexts where the term is used other than military contexts and while flying planes.

    The other contexts would be contexts such as military contexts and while flying planes.
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    There would be other contexts where the term is used other than military contexts and while flying planes.

    The other contexts would be contexts such as military contexts and while flying planes.
    I don't understand what you are saying here, but as Barque has said, there may be other contexts in which it might be natural or appropriate, but it's really not worth worrying about. Unless you intend to become a pilot, you will almost certainly never need to say it. I've never said it in my life so far, and I doubt if I ever will.
     
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