Regular Vs frequent: context coherence

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Hello everyone,

Is "very" necessary in order to make these two synonymous adjectices idiomatic in the context below or I can use "regular/frequent" without "very"?


1. I think we should give Mark a chance. He's a very frequent student and also important to the school. Getting involved in that fight can't make him lose everything.

2. I think we should give Mark a chance. He's a very regular student and also important to the school. Getting involved in that fight can't make him lose everything.

(Very) regular, (very) frequent: seldom missing classes, going to school/class very often.


Thank you in advance!
 
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  • pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    I don't think either of those gets your meaning across. I've never heard "frequent student" and "regular student" sounds to me like the opposite of an "extraordinary student." I think your best bet would be to say what you did at the end: he seldom misses classes.
     
    Thank you for your answer!

    I think the problem lies with the word "student" as I've seen "regular"/"frequent" in the examples below.

    ''He is a frequent student at the prestigious Seattle Institute for Advanced Dental Education, in Seattle, Washington and the Dawson Center.'' - Washington dentist, 20005, Washington Center for Dentistry


    ''He's one of the bar's regular customers.'' - Longman

     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I am not sure I understand what you are trying to express. Are you saying that the student attends all or most of the classes? In that case "attendant" (adjective) might work.

    at·ten·dant adj. 1. Being present: ships and attendant sailors.
    2. Accompanying or following as a result: attendant circumstances.

    (I am only showing the adjective definitions from The Free Dictionary On-line.)
     
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    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    seldom missing classes has nothing to do with frequent; seldom missing classes is concerned with attending regularly, which all students should do.

    "A sparrow is a frequent visitor to my garden, I saw him three times last week and four times the week before."
    frequent = often but irregularly.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    "Reliable" would work for me.

    He is a very reliable student; he rarely misses classes and his homework is usually right on time too.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    seldom missing classes has nothing to do with frequent; seldom missing classes is concerned with attending regularly, which all students should do.

    "A sparrow is a frequent visitor to my garden, I saw him three times last week and four times the week before."
    frequent = often but irregularly.
    I agree. The meaning was not properly expressed in the original sentences. I came away with an entirely different understanding (that did not make that much sense to me).
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    You can be "a frequent visitor" or "a regular visitor", but, to me, "a very frequent student" sound like sometimes he's not a student at all (like the visitor isn't a visitor when he's not visiting) and "a very regular student" has a bowel movement almost every day.
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    There's a difference between doing something regularly (at fixed intervals) and frequently (often).

    The adjectives don't apply very happily to students for the reasons people have been giving.

    A reliable student who works hard and attends his classes needs some other adjective, such as assiduous.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    If the attendance is the important point then,

    1. I think we should give Mark a chance. His attendance record is good and he is also important to the school. Getting involved in that fight can't make him lose everything.
     
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