Relative connector 'what' and preposition 'through'

Discussion in 'English Only' started by sonnen blume, Oct 5, 2015.

  1. sonnen blume New Member

    German - Germany
    Hello everybody,

    I'm an English student at a German university and I've got a question concerning the use of the relative connector 'what' and the preposition 'through'. I wrote a seminar paper on Shakespeare's Much Ado about Nothing and my lecturer didn't like the use of the relative connector 'what' to refer to whole phrases and the use of 'through'. Here are three examples:

    In doing so, Beatrice places herself in the centre of a discussion about her own future with or without a husband, what points to her awareness of the conventional stages in life a woman has to go through: maid, wife, and widow (Traub 133).

    <--->

    My questions are:
    Is it correct to use the connector 'what' as it is used in the first sentence? If not, what can I use instead?

    <--->

    Thank you very much for your help!

    <--- > One question per thread please. Additional questions removed. Cagey, moderator.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 2, 2015
  2. PaulQ

    PaulQ Senior Member

    UK
    English - England
    For your first question, "... that points to her awareness of the conventional stages in life [that] a woman has to go through: maid, wife, and widow

    What does not operate in this context as a subject pronoun in a subordinate clause -> that/which should be used.

    What usually means "the thing that"
     
  3. sonnen blume New Member

    German - Germany
    Thank you, PaulQ. Your reply helps a lot :)
     
  4. PaulQ

    PaulQ Senior Member

    UK
    English - England
    You posted whilst I was editing: I've added a bit. :thumbsup:
     

Share This Page

Loading...