Relative-Money-Lightness Bias

gioverario

Member
Italian - Italy
Hi :). I have to insert the title of the thesis. In this thesis I claim the existence of a bias that I call 'Relative-Money-Lightness Bias'. My question is: Is it correct the way I wrote the title?

Thank you
 
  • PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Welcome to WRF, gioverario,
    1. Is your question about the use of hyphens?
    2. Can you explain the concept of 'Relative-Money-Lightness Bias' concisely?
     

    gioverario

    Member
    Italian - Italy
    It is both about the use of hyphens and about the use of capital letter in titles.

    It is a bias according to which the person affected by it, gives a lower importance to money with respect to other things such as family, relax or something else.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Perhaps you could rethink the title, gioverario.:)

    I'm sorry to be blunt but the name you give to this bias doesn't tell me much, so it doesn't work for me as a title for your thesis either, with or without hyphens. :(
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    I agree with velisarius: one of the problems is that the word "Lightness" is not the converse of weight in the sense of value/significance:
    "His argument carried much weight.":tick:
    "His argument carried much lightness.":cross:

    As far as titles are concerned: all important words are capitalised.

    Your idea reminds me of the old joke that ends "I am rich enough to tell you that money is unimportant." :D
     

    gioverario

    Member
    Italian - Italy
    Maybe I was not clear. I claim the existence of a particular feature in the mind of a certain population. This feature consists in the fact that when an individual belonging to this population compares the benefits of spending her time trying to make money with spending it getting relax, she gives a lower weight to money with respect to an individual of another population. For that reason I use the expression "relative lightness", in the sense that money as a lower "weight", a lower importance with respect to an individual belonging to another population.
     

    gioverario

    Member
    Italian - Italy
    Ah ok. So now I have two questions:
    1 How could I sobstitute lightness, given that I want to express the converse of value/significance
    2 Should I use the hypens?
     

    RedwoodGrove

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    You have created a term: "money-lightness". If you were to use that term, I would suggest you hyphenate it like this: "Relative Money-Lightness Bias".

    But what is "relative" here is the importance versus unimportance of money. You could just as easily title it: "The Money Significance/Insignificance Bias".

    I've heard people, after the fact, talk about how difficult it was to come up with a title. It's no small thing.
     

    gioverario

    Member
    Italian - Italy
    I think it is necessary to use the word 'relative', because in the work I explicitly say that I am not claiming that for these individuals money is NOT important but that when you make a comparison between money and relax (or family), money is SLIGHTLY LESS important WITH RESPECT TO relax.

    Maybe I could be more clear. Assuming we can give an evaluation to money and to relax on a 0-10 scale, I am not saying that money's score is 0, but that while for a 'normal person' the ratio 'money score'/'relax score' is, say, equal to 2, for a person affected by this bias it is equal to 1.

    Thank you for your patience
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I can't come up with anything better than has already been suggested, I'm afraid, but I think it would be helpful to point out that we don't use 'relax' as a noun in the way you are using it. 'Relax' is a verb, and 'relaxation' is the noun. If you are writing for native speakers, 'relax' will stand out as odd.

    You might consider 'leisure' instead, as this is often used as an opposite to, say, 'work'.
     

    gioverario

    Member
    Italian - Italy
    Ok thanks heypresto for the correction.

    So just to be sure, does someone strongly disagree with Relative Money-Lightness Bias?

    Thank you again
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I'm not keen on "Relative Money-Lightness Bias", as I mentioned before.

    Unfortunately, the only version I came up with would probably be too wordy for your purposes: Location-dependent prioritising of free time v money.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    gioverario said:
    Relative-Money-Lightness Bias': It is a bias according to which the person affected by it, gives a lower importance to money with respect to other things such as family, relax or something else.
    The whole phrase 'Relative-Money-Lightness Bias' needs replacing and I would suggest “Relative Income/Capital Disinterest.”

    It is genuinely difficult in English to string three nouns together, as the preceding nouns act adjectivally and become ambiguous as to whether they are cumulative or independent in their effect on the noun, and if so, which noun.

    The meaning of “money” makes this even more difficult as it tends to mean “wealth” or “spending power” rather than “the normal utility of disposable money that is received as wages, dividends, etc.” The [normally] perceived utility of disposable income is probably the nearest but that does not include capital.

    I do not think that “bias” works either: Bias is a deviation from not only the norm, but also from the desired norm, and “bias” is seen as negative. You need to express the idea of “bias” - in the sense of “an attitude” - in the neutral, i.e. a disinterest.

    There are three circumstances in which I see 'Relative-Money-Lightness Bias' as a relevant concept:

    1. Possession of a large amount of capital that the person with 'Relative-Money-Lightness Bias' ignores.
    2. Receipt of an excessive salary that the person with 'Relative-Money-Lightness Bias' ignores or which fails to motivate.
    3. A combination of both.

    “Relative Income/Capital Disinterest.” seems to do this, but, as always, I'm open to other suggestions.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    Ok thanks heypresto for the correction.

    So just to be sure, does someone strongly disagree with Relative Money-Lightness Bias?

    Thank you again
    Yes. I strongly disagree. I think all your native speaker participants are strongly disagreeing!
    It does not convey what you want in your title.

    PaulQ has made a good stab at offering suggestions, and I totally agree that it needs a re-write. You might have to accept a slightly longer title to cover your topic.
     

    gioverario

    Member
    Italian - Italy
    Thank you PaulQ. The only thing I would contest you is what you wrote about the word 'bias'. To be more precise, I agree with what you wrote, but in Economics nowadays it is used the world 'bias' even in cases in which one evaluates neutrally a given 'non ordinary' behavior.

    As to what you wrote about the world 'money' it is exactly 'wealth' or 'spending power' the idea would like to refer to.

    Therefore I would choose Relative Money Disinterest Bias if there are not other objections
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Relative Money-Disinterest Bias note the hyphen. :tick: Forget "relative" - see #9 - Your explanation, which may be necessary in Italian, does not work in English as relative does not mean what you want it to mean.
     
    Last edited:

    gioverario

    Member
    Italian - Italy
    But should not I sobstitute the word 'relative' with something else? Remember I do not want to say that the individuals affected by the bias do not care at all about money.

    #10: ''Assuming we can give an evaluation to money and to relax on a 0-10 scale, I am not saying that money's score is 0, but that while for a 'normal person' the ratio 'money score'/'relax score' is, say, equal to 2, for a person affected by this bias it is equal to 1.''

    Maybe 'Comparative Money-Disinterest Bias'?
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    But should not I substitute the word 'relative' with something else?
    No. I don't think that it is necessary to use any word at all.

    The phrase 'Money-Disinterest Bias' is an abstract concept, and your definition of "bias" may, in terms of logic, be compare to a disease or an attribute that defines a group. You can suffer, at various (comparative) levels (of severity), from a disease, or have a dominant or recessive attribute and the general population may not show any signs of either the disease/attribute at all. The fact that you are comparing those with the disease or attribute to those who do not have it is blindingly obvious and should not be stated.
     

    gioverario

    Member
    Italian - Italy
    No I am not saying that it is necessary to use another word in order to remark the comparison with other individuals in the population, but to remark the comparison between money and other 'goods' such as family or leisure.

    There is no a disinterest toward money, but there is a lower importance attributed to money when compared with leisure (or family). This is a crucial argument and I would like that the title convey it.

    Thank you in advance
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Perhaps, in Italian, there are words that look or sound like "comparative" and "relative". However, I would hazard a guess that they are "false friends" - In Language, a false friend is a word in one language that looks like a word in another language, but whose meanings differ significantly.

    In English, "relative + noun" = the noun that is related to a comparator - and the "comparator" should be stated or, at least, obviously implied. Your original title has absolutely no comparator, nor is one implied.

    "I paid £2,000 for the car and that was a relative bargain as they usually sell for £3,000."
    In English "comparative + noun" = the noun that may be compared to something - and the "something" should be stated or, at least, obviously implied. Your suggestion in #19 has absolutely no comparator, nor is one implied.

    My advice is "Give up and take the advice offered by us all."
     

    gioverario

    Member
    Italian - Italy
    Ok thank you. Just a last question. If I decided to restrict my argument saying that the bias consists in a disinterest toward a 'career as entrepreneur', would the expression 'entrepreurship-disinterest bias' work?
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Just a last question.- Just a last answer. 'Entrepreneurship-Disinterest Bias' works in the same way that 'Money-Disinterest Bias' works. As a title, I would award both 5.8/10.

    I see you have committed yourself heavily to the formula "X-Disinterest Bias' and, as it is your creation, I can see why you would like to stick with it.
     

    RedwoodGrove

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    It sounds like what you are saying is: "The Relative Money Motivation-Disinterest Bias" or just "Money Motivation-Disinterest Bias". (With or without the definite article works.)
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I'm not sure I've really understood what your thesis is about, and what makes your concept original, but it seems to me that the interesting thing may be

    "a lower importance with respect to an individual belonging to another population"

    Perhaps you could give some hint in your title to the fact that this is a comparative study. How do you mean "another population"? Are you saying that it's a comparative study of several groups, distinguished by class or location or education or something else?
     

    gioverario

    Member
    Italian - Italy
    I am not trying to propose oriniginal concepts but to formalize my claim in a mathematical framework. The key idea is that there is population A and population B and the only thing that distinguishes them is the bias itself. I think I will restrict the definition of the bias claiming that population A is less attract by making money through an entrepreneurial activity with respect to population B. Then the better title I can think of is 'entrepreneurship-disinterest bias'.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    This is quite remarkable :rolleyes:.

    Entrepreneurship and Money are totally different words, hence, when used either as a qualifier, their respective phrases mean completely different things.
    As to what you wrote about the world 'money' it is exactly 'wealth' or 'spending power' the idea would like to refer to.
    Obviously, "Entrepreneurship" does not have this meaning - "Entrepreneurship" = the quality of being adept at being an entrepreneur. "Entrepreneur" = "c. Polit. Econ. One who undertakes an enterprise; one who owns and manages a business; a person who takes the risk of profit or loss."

    Someone who has no desire to start their own business might be said to have "An Entrepreneurial Disinterest": it says absolutely nothing about what the person does with any money he makes.
    Someone who,regardless of their liquid assets and source of income has no desire to buy more than their minimal needs might be said to have "Money Disinterest".

    I have already suggested that
    It is genuinely difficult in English to string three nouns together, as the preceding nouns act adjectivally and become ambiguous as to whether they are cumulative or independent in their effect on the noun, and if so, which noun.
    I could add that the "three-noun phrase" is commonly used by those who wish to make something sound redolent with professional meaning, but the successful three-noun phrases are few and far between.

    I think you need (i) to define clearly what the essence of your thesis is and (ii) consider adjectives.
     

    gioverario

    Member
    Italian - Italy
    I think my argument will be what I wrote in #28 so that the bias refers exactly to "someone who has no desire to start their own business". I do not know which adjective may help me to be more clear... So, the best title I can think to is now "Entrepreneurial-Disinterest Bias" (thank you for the correction).
     
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