Relative pronouns - market leaders and agencies, <which, who> ...

stella_maris_74

Mod About Chocolate
Italian - Italy
Hi all,
could someone please help with this (maybe dumb) doubt:

I also enjoy it [this job] deeply and I believe this is actually what allowed me, along with my professionalism, to win the esteem and trust of an ever growing number of market leaders and agencies, who constantly entrust me with transcreation projects concerning their top brands.

As far as I recall, "Who" should be used when related to people, "which" when related to inanimate objects or animals.
But here, we have "market leaders" and "(advertising) agencies)": do I need to consider them people (=who) or "entities" (=which)?

(Please don't say they're animals - although they *can* be sometimes :p)

As always, please feel very welcome to correct what's wrong.

Thanks!

dani
 
  • pescara

    Senior Member
    English-USA
    Dani,
    If you were just talking about market leaders, you would definitely use "who." If it were just agencies, it would be "which." In this case, with both, I would use "who."

    A few other comments:
    I would say "I believe this is actually what has allowed me"

    Also, I have never heard the term "transcreation." Maybe this is a technical term in the branding/marketing field that I'm just not familiar with. Is this a translation from an Italian word?
     

    stella_maris_74

    Mod About Chocolate
    Italian - Italy
    Hi Pescara,
    and thanks again for your suggestions and corrections.

    "Transcreation" is a made-up word (not by me, it is known in the related business area), which comes from translation+creation and defines the job of adapting creative texts (such as those related to advertising) from one language into another.
    It's actually all about applying copywriting skills (=creative) to a translation process, so the resulting message appears "creatively suitable" for the destination language/market without looking like a translation.
    Many advertising campaigns -mainly for the big, multinational brands- are conceived in English, but then need to be on air in different markets all around the world - thus in different languages.

    By the way, the person doing such a job is called "transcreator", ie "creative translator".

    I hope my explanation is clear :)

    ciao,

    dani
     

    stella_maris_74

    Mod About Chocolate
    Italian - Italy
    Well, it *can* be a fascinating job indeed... and fun also! :)
    Thank *you* for giving me the chance to reward you for your help!

    ciao,

    dani
     

    ElaineG

    Senior Member
    USA/English
    I would say "who" too, but I'm not sure if that's right. I'd be interesting in hearing from someone who can explain better than I can right now.
     

    stella_maris_74

    Mod About Chocolate
    Italian - Italy
    Thanks to all for the input provided.
    I see even natives share my doubt with that bit... so maybe it wasn't as dumb as I thought! :)
    Actually, I was on the wrong track anyway because I would have assumed that "market leaders" (which can refer both to companies or products) would require a "which" and "agencies" (which actually stands for "the people working in there") would require a "who".
    After all, it's not the "market leaders" or "the agencies" as "entities" who entrust me with the jobs... it's the people in there taking the decision.
    That's why I thought that "who" could be more gramatically correct than "which", but still...
    Does this reasoning have any point at all, you dear natives?

    thanks again,

    dani

    (sorry for posting this in the wrong forum in the first place. I was actually translating from italian)
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    [...](sorry for posting this in the wrong forum in the first place. I was actually translating from italian)
    True, but you were asking, in English, about English usage. Questions like that are always welcome in the English Only forum

    English is flexible about whether companies should be considered personal or impersonal - singular or plural. The "right" answer usually depends on the context, and in your context who has to be right.
     
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